The Health News – 11 April 2017

Overview:

• Hillier resident Jenny Hallam’s home was raided by police back in January and products, which she says she only ever supplied to sick people for free, were seized. Lawyer Heather Stokes said she was “puzzled” about why it took police so long to charge her client.

• Dr Heather Smyth, a flavour and sensory scientist and research fellow from the University of Queensland, said temperature and memories worked hand in hand when it came to smell. The part of the brain that controls aroma or olfaction (sense of smell) also looks after long-term memories, behaviour and emotions. Dr Smyth said often the food people craved or desired in the cooler months had a strong emotional connection.

• Judge Cavanagh released his findings into the death of Yirrkala girl Gabby Wanambi, who was just 11 years old when she died in May 2014 after an ankle injury turned septic. Following the inquest into the death of Gabby, the Top End Health Service’s submission to the coroner outlined an Emergency Medicine Stream — a system to ensure high standards of care and risk management — for Top End hospitals at Gove, Katherine and Palmerston.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  11th of April 2017. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health New

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-04-10/medicinal-cannabis-oil-charges-puzzle-lawyer-as-debate-grows/8429734

The lawyer for a South Australian woman who admits to supplying cannabis oil to terminally ill people has questioned why charges against her client have only recently been laid.

Hillier resident Jenny Hallam’s home was raided by police back in January and products, which she says she only ever supplied to sick people for free, were seized.

Ms Hallam has been summonsed to appear in court in May over allegations she possessed, with the purpose to supply, and manufactured a controlled drug.

Lawyer Heather Stokes said she was “puzzled” about why it took police so long to charge her client.

Ms Stokes questioned why her client was being prosecuted when the state was likely to change the law, which would have “massive [public] support”.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-04-10/does-cooler-weather-make-us-smell-better/8430250

As the seasons change and we edge closer to winter, is it possible that our sense of smell becomes heightened?

Each day we smell hundreds of different scents, from freshly brewed coffee to the tuna in your workmate’s salad at the desk next to you.

Dr Heather Smyth, a flavour and sensory scientist and research fellow from the University of Queensland, said temperature and memories worked hand in hand when it came to smell.

“It’s not the air that carries more smell when it’s cold,” she said.

“For example, if you’re in an area where there’s rotting things and it’s hot, the smell is really, really strong.

“If it’s cold, the smell is much less intense.”

But we are attuned to smell more in winter, particularly when it comes to food, because strong scents become more obvious to detect.

“In winter, when something has been cooked, it’s hot and the smell compounds are in the air because the heat is generating them,” Dr Smyth [said]…

The part of the brain that controls aroma or olfaction (sense of smell) also looks after long-term memories, behaviour and emotions.

Dr Smyth said often the food people craved or desired in the cooler months had a strong emotional connection.

She said the mental association with cooler weather and cravings due to a memory could force us “to want hot chips or warm casseroles in winter”.

In Queensland, above-average temperatures throughout summer have meant that recent cooler weather has made it more noticeable to smell new and different scents.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-04-07/gabby-wanambi-calls-for-top-end-emergency-management-overhaul/8426652

A second preventable death due to septicaemia at a bush hospital in the Northern Territory has prompted Coroner Greg Cavanagh to call for a new model of emergency service management at all Top End hospitals.

Judge Cavanagh released his findings into the death of Yirrkala girl Gabby Wanambi, who was just 11 years old when she died in May 2014 after an ankle injury turned septic.

Her worried parents took her to the Gove Hospital four times in three days.

On the third occasion …the nurse who saw her made a call to Dr Geoffrey Harper, who was on call, expecting him to come in to the hospital.

Dr Harper instead prescribed antibiotics and painkillers over the phone and Gabby was sent home.

Her condition got worse and when her parents took her back to the hospital the next day, she was too ill to even be transferred to Royal Darwin Hospital. She died later that evening.

In his findings, Judge Cavanagh said he had been told that some doctors in big cities may never see a case of septicaemia, but it is more common in the Northern Territory.

Following the inquest into the death of Gabby, the Top End Health Service’s submission to the coroner outlined an Emergency Medicine Stream — a system to ensure high standards of care and risk management — for Top End hospitals at Gove, Katherine and Palmerston.

The Coroner has now recommended that the system be introduced as a priority and that it be sustainable.

But the health service said the system could not be established without more funding from the NT Government.

Health Minister Natasha Fyles was contacted for comment.