Overview:

• The city’s first and only stand-up paddleboard (SUP) yoga classes have wrapped up after the first season and instructor Jo Flynn says the possibility of taking a plunge just made it all the more rewarding for her students. SUP yoga is exactly as it sounds — yoga classes held atop paddleboards on a body of water.

• The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) has denied a terminally ill mother help to keep communicating with her family. Dr Harley, who is on the NSW Motor Neurone Disease Association board, said her impression of what [the NDIS planner] was saying is that the disease is likely to progress rapidly and therefore it’s not worth spending the money. Dr Harley is expected to appeal against the decision.

• The Diabetes Research WA funded study found children diagnosed with T1D had an elevated risk of end-stage kidney disease and stroke compared to the general population. The research team, led by Telethon Kids Institute PhD student Matthew Cooper, analysed the health records of more than 1,300 West Australians diagnosed with T1D as children. Diabetes Research WA executive director Sherl Westlund said this type of research had the potential to improve the lives of those living with T1D.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  17th of April 2017. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-04-15/paddleboard-yoga-wraps-up-first-season-on-lake-burley-griffin/8441640

Mastering yoga positions can be challenging at the best of times, but some keen yogis have taken it even further, adding into the mix the threat of taking a dip in Canberra’s Lake Burley Griffin.

The city’s first and only stand-up paddleboard (SUP) yoga classes have wrapped up after the first season and instructor Jo Flynn says the possibility of taking a plunge just made it all the more rewarding for her students.

SUP yoga is exactly as it sounds — yoga classes held atop paddleboards on a body of water.

Ms Flynn runs Joga Yoga in Canberra, hosting classes both on land and the lake.

… she admitted most people were originally taken aback by the idea of SUP yoga.

Ms Flynn said despite how it may look, all classes were open to beginners and she tailored the sessions to suite [sic] different levels of experience.

Ms Flynn cancels classes over winter and in dangerous weather.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-04-15/terminally-ill-mother-fears-ndis-writes-off-people/8445228

The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) has denied a terminally ill mother help to keep communicating with her family.

Sydney woman Kirsten Harley has motor neurone disease (MND) and will lose the ability to move and speak.

The former academic applied to the NDIS for technology that allows people to use eye movement to communicate and do other regular activities, such as opening doors.

But Dr Harley’s request was refused last Wednesday.

Dr Harley fears other people with incurable neurological conditions are also being rejected by the scheme.

“My impression of what [the NDIS planner] was saying is that the disease is likely to progress rapidly and therefore it’s not worth spending the money,” she said.

“The whole point of the NDIS is to promote independence and to promote a place in society for people with significant disability. [she said]

Dr Harley, who is also on the NSW Motor Neurone Disease Association board, is expected to appeal against the decision.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-04-14/research-reveals-future-health-risks-for-kids-with-type-one-dia/8444350

Some children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) have an increased risk of developing vascular disease in early adulthood, a study has found.

The Diabetes Research WA funded study found children diagnosed with T1D had an elevated risk of end-stage kidney disease and stroke compared to the general population.

The research team, led by Telethon Kids Institute PhD student Matthew Cooper, analysed the health records of more than 1,300 West Australians diagnosed with T1D as children.

It found that by early adulthood, 32 of the patients had been hospitalised and treated for a vascular complication, including eye disease.

“What we’ve found is that women and those from a low socio-economic background and those with a history of poor diabetes management during their childhood and adolescent years are at an increased risk of developing cardiovascular complications during early adulthood,” Mr Cooper said.

“These include stroke, eye and kidney disease.”

Mr Cooper said children who have blood glucose levels consistently above the normal range were at a higher risk of developing those diseases.

The new results are an extension of an ongoing study which found women, who had childhood onset type one diabetes, had an early adulthood mortality rate 11 times higher than the general population.

Diabetes Research WA executive director Sherl Westlund said this type of research had the potential to improve the lives of those living with T1D.

 



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