Overview:
• A modified version of the Fasting-Mimicking diet (FMD) has the ability to regenerate the pancreas and could potentially reverse diabetes, according to trials.

• Darwin clinic is helping transgender people like Evo Koulaki, a transgender from female to male. Evo has special needs such as testosterone replacement therapy, which are difficult to access outside major capital cities like Sydney and Melbourne.

• According to reports,  Australia’s biggest cities could struggle to attract enough disability workers for the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  27th of February 2017. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-02-26/fasting-diet-could-reverse-diabetes-and-regenerate-the-pancreas/8304426

A fasting diet has the ability to regenerate the pancreas and could potentially reverse diabetes, researchers have found.

A US study, published in scientific journal Cell, tested a modified version of the fasting-mimicking diet (FMD) on both mice and human cells.

The findings showed cycles of the diet could regenerate pancreatic cells to restore insulin in type 1 diabetes patients and could also reverse both type 1 and 2 diabetes in mice.

The study’s co-author, Dr Valter Longo from the University of Southern California, …[stated] the findings were “potentially very exciting” because they could lead to cures for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

Dr Longo also said a FMD could also regenerate other organs because their research had shown similar effects for blood cells.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-02-26/transgender-clinic-medical-services-gap-nt/8293440

A monthly Darwin clinic is helping transgender people previously overlooked by the Northern Territory’s health system, yet its long-term future is uncertain due to funding concerns.

Father and husband Evo Koulakis is one of an unidentified number of transgender Territorians who have had to navigate the Top End’s health system.

His transition from female to male three years ago means he has specialist needs such as testosterone replacement therapy; these are difficult to access outside major capital cities like Sydney and Melbourne.

When he has seen specialists at Darwin’s hospital, their lack of knowledge left him confronted.

In mid-2016 Dr Stewart decided to launch a one-day-a-month health clinic for LGBTQI people out of her general practice in Darwin’s leafy northern suburbs.

“Everyone is welcome here,” reads the rainbow-hued posters in Northside Health’s waiting room.

A specialist was flown from interstate with funding from the NT AIDS and Hepatitis Council (NTAHC), yet Dr Stewart had no idea if anybody would show up for the clinic’s first day.

This was largely because, until recently, the NT Health Department did not take data on the prevalence of gender diversity in its population.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-02-25/ndis-report-warns-major-cities-not-prepared-for-implementation/8303276

Parts of Australia’s biggest cities could struggle to attract enough disability workers for the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS), a new report has warned.

The Productivity Commission has identified south-west Sydney, southern Melbourne and Logan in Brisbane as areas that currently have less than 40 per cent of the workforce it is expected they will need.

Australia’s disability workforce is set to double by 2020 to around 150,000 people.

The commission will examine whether the growth is feasible amid “some evidence that providers are finding it more difficult to recruit staff”.

National Disability Services (NDS) chief executive Ken Baker said finding staff can be a challenge.

Sydney-based disability service provider Achieve Australia has seen demand climb during recent weeks, forcing it to bolster its 400-strong workforce.

Cost pressures facing the NDIS will also come under scrutiny.

The commission said more children than expected had joined the scheme, especially in South Australia, Victoria and the ACT.

It also said fewer people than expected had exited the NDIS during trial periods and the cost of care packages was increasing faster than inflation.

The final report is due in September this year.



Leave a reply