The Health News United Kingdom November 24 2017

  • Different types of alcoholic drink change and shape your mood in different ways, says a study into drinking and emotions. According to researchers, spirits may make you feel angry, sexy or tearful, while red wine or beer may make you feel relaxed. Drinking spirits was more likely than all other drink types to be associated with feelings of aggression, illness, restlessness and tearfulness.
  • A major study is to look at whether talking therapy can help cancer survivors cope with fears of a relapse and speed up their recovery following treatment for the disease. Researchers at Queen Mary University of London will examine whether offering help with emotional issues, concerns about work or fears of relapse can improve long-term outcomes.
  • Researchers believe that children’s time spent staring at the television, smartphones and tablets should be limited to 90 minutes a day to stop them from becoming obese. A group of European child health experts have found a strong link between obesity and prolonged exposure to media and technology during their formative years.
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The Health News USA November 24 2017

  • Victoria will enact the only legal voluntary assisted-dying scheme in the country in a move met with mixed emotion. Labor government-proposed legislation won narrow support in the state’s upper house on Wednesday after 28  hours of continuous debate and the second of two overnight sittings. Advocates for voluntary assisted-dying welcomed the passage of the legislation through the state’s upper house despite the amendments.
  • With the evolution of smartphones, the Australian Communications and Media Authority reported in 2016 that 5.78 million Australians had a mobile phone, but no fixed-line phone. When children were once taught to dial 000 on the landline, the raft of security and user features on mobiles is adding complexity to teaching kids how to respond in an emergency. An app called Emergency + had been developed to help make it easier for kids when responding to an emergency using a smartphone.
  • According to reports, some well-known Australian companies are investigating whether they can encourage female employees to focus more on their careers by paying for their eggs to be frozen. News Corp reports that the companies are already in negotiations with Australia’s first dedicated egg-freezing clinic. The move would follow the lead of major US companies including Apple, which pays up to $20,000 to freeze its workers’ eggs.
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The Health News Australia November 24 2017

  • Victoria will enact the only legal voluntary assisted-dying scheme in the country in a move met with mixed emotion. Labor government-proposed legislation won narrow support in the state’s upper house on Wednesday after 28  hours of continuous debate and the second of two overnight sittings. Advocates for voluntary assisted-dying welcomed the passage of the legislation through the state’s upper house despite the amendments.
  • With the evolution of smartphones, the Australian Communications and Media Authority reported in 2016 that 5.78 million Australians had a mobile phone, but no fixed-line phone. When children were once taught to dial 000 on the landline, the raft of security and user features on mobiles is adding complexity to teaching kids how to respond in an emergency. An app called Emergency + had been developed to help make it easier for kids when responding to an emergency using a smartphone.
  • According to reports, some well-known Australian companies are investigating whether they can encourage female employees to focus more on their careers by paying for their eggs to be frozen. News Corp reports that the companies are already in negotiations with Australia’s first dedicated egg-freezing clinic. The move would follow the lead of major US companies including Apple, which pays up to $20,000 to freeze its workers’ eggs.
Read More

The Health News United Kingdom November 23 2017

  • Cancer tests will be offered in supermarket car parks as part of a national drive to boost early diagnosis rates. NHS England will announce potential lung cancer patients in some regions of the country will be invited to community mobile screening units in a bid to catch their cancer early. A pilot that took place in Manchester saw potential cancer patients invited for a lung health check. People with a history of smoking aged 55 to 74 were invited for CT scans at mobile units – which were placed in shopping centre car parks or community hubs.
  • Research reveals that young people are taking part in a wider range of sexual practices, including anal sex, with opposite sex partners. Experts looked at responses to a national sex survey that has been carried out every 10  years since 1990 in the UK. More than one in ten millennial teenagers said they had tried anal sex by the age of 18. By the age of 22 to 24, 3 in every 10 said they had tried it.
  • The head of the NHS has sad that early cancer diagnosis makes a “staggering” difference to survival rates, with patients 18 times more likely to live when the disease is caught sooner. Simon Stevens said improving speed of cancer diagnosis is now the biggest challenge facing the service, as he outlined plans to boost survival rates. Mr. Stevens said earlier diagnosis would save money as well as lives, reducing reliance on the most expensive treatments.
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The Health News USA November 23 2017

  • Ancestry, 23andMe and dozens of other genetics companies all started selling on Amazon in the “home tests” category in the past year or two, with the bigger players working closely with Amazon to make that happen. Among the first to initiate sales on the website was Ancestry, which started offering a DNA test for lineage and family connections through the marketplace in 2015.
  • An old study is now shedding new light on the sugar industry’s controversial past, and its secrets are being revealed in a new paper. The 1960’s study, which suggests a link between a high-sugar diet and high blood cholesterol levels and cancer in rats, was sponsored by the sugar industry, according to the perspective paper published in the journal PLOS Biology on Tuesday.
  • New research suggests this may be true when giving an insulin pill to try to prevent or delay type 1 diabetes. Researchers tested the effect of insulin pills on 560 children and adults whose relatives had type one diabetes. For most of them, the drug had no effect on whether or not they developed type one diabetes, or how quickly they developed it. The researchers said that for those at the highest risk of developing type 1 diabetes sooner rather than later, insulin pill therapy delayed the time it took to develop the full-blown disease by about 2-and-a-half years.
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The Health News Australia November 23 2017

  • Patients now have access to an interactive one-stop shop website for cancer information, with data on survival rates, screening and treatment. Cancer Australia CEO Professor Helen Zorbas said the new National Cancer Control Indicators (NCCI) website was a unique, national resource bringing reliable national data together for the first time. The website was designed for policymakers, governments, cancer organisation, researchers and health professionals.
  • Bannister Law is investigating a possible class action against the creators of Banana Boat aerosol sunscreens, after consumers complained of being burned while using the products. It has has launched its investigation today, after it asked skincare product-testing company Eurofins Dermatest to conduct independent tests on seven Banana Boat aerosol sunscreens. The tests showed that the sun protection factor (SPF) for Banana Boat’s SPF 50+ aerosol range fell short of the marketed SPF 50+
  • A Malaysian researcher has raised concern post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may be going undiagnosed in cancer survivors. research suggests that PTSD in cancer patients may be much higher than previously thought. A Malaysian study of nearly 500 patients published in journal CANCER found 22% had partial or full PTSD six months after diagnosis.
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The Health News United Kingdom November 22 2017

  • Decades after they were banned from the airwaves, Big Tobacco companies return to prime-time television this weekend — but not by choice. Under court order, the tobacco industry for the first time will be forced to advertise the deadly, addictive effects of smoking, more than eleven years after a judge ruled that the companies had misled the public about the dangers of cigarettes.  Anti-tobacco advocates estimate the upcoming TV advertisements will cost companies a tiny fraction of that, about $30 million dollars.
  • According to a new US study, high school athletes have high rates of hand and wrist injuries, especially in certain sports. The authors say that football players have the highest risk by far, but lacrosse, field and ice hockey, wrestling, softball and basketball also carry higher odds of these injuries, which can require costly surgery and keep kids out of the game for weeks.
  • The nine-year-old Jacob Thompson whose wish for Christmas cards went viral died on Sunday, one week after he was able to enjoy a special celebration of his favorite holiday. Jacob who had been battling stage 4 high risk neuroblastoma since age 5, had received thousands of cards and gifts from strangers all over the world.
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The Health News USA November 22 2017

  • Decades after they were banned from the airwaves, Big Tobacco companies return to prime-time television this weekend — but not by choice. Under court order, the tobacco industry for the first time will be forced to advertise the deadly, addictive effects of smoking, more than eleven years after a judge ruled that the companies had misled the public about the dangers of cigarettes.  Anti-tobacco advocates estimate the upcoming TV advertisements will cost companies a tiny fraction of that, about $30 million dollars.
  • According to a new US study, high school athletes have high rates of hand and wrist injuries, especially in certain sports. The authors say that football players have the highest risk by far, but lacrosse, field and ice hockey, wrestling, softball and basketball also carry higher odds of these injuries, which can require costly surgery and keep kids out of the game for weeks.
  • The nine-year-old Jacob Thompson whose wish for Christmas cards went viral died on Sunday, one week after he was able to enjoy a special celebration of his favorite holiday. Jacob who had been battling stage 4 high risk neuroblastoma since age 5, had received thousands of cards and gifts from strangers all over the world.
Read More

The Health News Australia November 22 2017

  • Patients now have access to an interactive one-stop shop website for cancer information, with data on survival rates, screening and treatment. Cancer Australia CEO Professor Helen Zorbas said the new National Cancer Control Indicators (NCCI) website was a unique, national resource bringing reliable national data together for the first time. The website was designed for policymakers, governments, cancer organisation, researchers and health professionals.
  • Bannister Law is investigating a possible class action against the creators of Banana Boat aerosol sunscreens, after consumers complained of being burned while using the products. It has has launched its investigation today, after it asked skincare product-testing company Eurofins Dermatest to conduct independent tests on seven Banana Boat aerosol sunscreens. The tests showed that the sun protection factor (SPF) for Banana Boat’s SPF 50+ aerosol range fell short of the marketed SPF 50+
  • A Malaysian researcher has raised concern post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may be going undiagnosed in cancer survivors. research suggests that PTSD in cancer patients may be much higher than previously thought. A Malaysian study of nearly 500 patients published in journal CANCER found 22% had partial or full PTSD six months after diagnosis.
Read More

The Health News Australia November 21 2017

  • Research has found a high-salt diet reduced levels of Lactobacillus bacteria in mice and increased production of immune cells linked to high blood pressure. A German study has found that excessive salt intake wipes out levels of good bacteria in the gut and this can cause blood pressure to rise.  The findings have raised hope a simple probiotic could be used as a tool to help reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke caused by hypertension.
  • The Australian Capital Territory government is reviewing barriers women may be facing when trying to access abortion services in Canberra. It’s part of a wider review into sexual and reproductive health services the government expects to be completed by mid-2018. Health minister Meegan Fitzharris is hoping ACT Health and the Women’s Centre for Health Matters (WCHM) will be able to provide a clearer picture of barriers Canberra women  face when accessing abortion services.
  • Abandon the idea of continuous general practitioner care and throw away your fax machine – a new Microsoft report has told Australian healthcare it needs to undergo a dramatic change in mindset and get with the digital revolution. The ‘GP for thirty years’ care delivery model will disappear with patients already seeking primary care from five different clinics and eleven doctors in their lifetime.
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