The Health News USA August 12 2017

Overview

  • More than 1,000 people participated in a Twitter poll on the topic “Would you trust a technology company like Apple, Amazon or Google with your health data?” and the majority of people responded that they would trust a major technology company like Apple, Amazon and Google. The one clear winner emerged from the 3 major players: Apple. The company has made repeated assurances to users that it will not sell health data to advertisers.
  • According to a new study, the overall rate of strokes is declining in the United States, but it appears to be going down mostly in men. According to the news findings , the decreases in rates of stroke over time are primarily driven by decreased stroke rates in men.
  • Max Barry, the 22-year-old son of Nashville Mayor Megan Barry, died last month from an accidental drug overdose complicated in part by morbid obesity. According to the coroner’s report, he had several drugs in his system at the time of his death including methadone, THC, cocaine, alprazolam and hydromorphine. The report said he also had other health problems, including hypertension, fatty liver disease and fatty deposits in two of his major arteries, and a reported “history of prescription drug abuse with withdrawal symptoms.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 12th of August 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

https://www.cnbc.com/2017/08/09/apple-google-or-amazon-who-do-you-trust-with-your-health-data.html

Would you trust a technology company like Apple, Amazon or Google with your health data?

More than one thousand people participated in a Twitter poll on the topic, and the majority of people responding that they would. Only thirty seven percent of people responded that they would not share their data. Among those who opted to share their health data with a tech company, one clear winner emerged: Apple.

It has been two years since the research firm Rock Health surveyed the American public and found that most people would not trust a tech company with their data. Only about eight percent said they would share their health information. This poll isn’t comparable. It was entirely unscientific in nature, and did not represent a diverse swath of the public. … Still, privacy experts say there is something revealing in the results. In their experience, sentiment does seem to be changing around the major tech companies, particularly Apple.

“Apple has done a big push around health and privacy to breed comfort,” said Andrew Boyd, a professor of biomedical and health information sciences at the University of Illinois. As Boyd points out, Apple has shared plans to aggregate health information on the phone so users can share it — with consent. And as CNBC reported, the company plans to follow up by integrating other types of medical data, like clinical labs, which have historically been scattered across hospitals and clinics. The company has made repeated assurances to users that it will not sell health data to advertisers. That policy extends to third-party developers.

The company also went up against the Federal Bureau of Investigation in refusing to help the agency unlock the iPhone of the San Bernardino shooter, which some interpreted as a move to protect privacy and security.

As Apple CEO Tim Cook told National Public Radio or NPR: “Some of our most personal data is on the phone – our financial data, our health information, our conversations with our friends and family and coworkers. And so instead of us taking that data into Apple, we’ve kept data on the phone, and it’s encrypted by you. You control it.”

http://siouxcityjournal.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/stroke-rates-drop-for-u-s-men-but-not-women/article_b784e4a0-a704-578e-b98d-67b0d367e889.html

The overall rate of strokes is declining in the United States, but appears to be going down mostly in men, a new study finds. Lead researcher Doctor Tracy Madsen said that

our findings suggest that the decreases in rates of stroke over time are primarily driven by decreased stroke rates in men. That makes doctors wonder why American women aren’t seeing the same benefits from stroke prevention. “It may be that stroke prevention strategies are not as effective in women compared with men,’’  Madsen said.

Madsen is an assistant professor of emergency medicine at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, in Rhode Island. “Stroke is a debilitating yet preventable condition, and future efforts should focus on stroke prevention in both women and men, as well as figuring out why rates of stroke in women did not decrease over this time period,” she added.

For the study, Madsen and her colleagues collected data on one point three million adults living in southwest Ohio and northern Kentucky between nineteen ninety three and two thousand and ten.They looked at hospital, clinic and coroners’ records to identify how many people had a first stroke during four one-year time periods, spaced approximately five years apart.

Among more than seven thousand seven hundred strokes, fifty seven percent were women, the researchers said. The rate of strokes among men went from two hundred sixty three strokes per one hundred thousand at the start of the study to one hundred ninety two per one hundred thousand at the end of the study. For women, however, the rate went from two hundred seventeen strokes per one hundred thousand in nineteen ninety three to one hundred ninety eight per one hundred thousand in two thousand ten. This is not a statistically significant decline, the researchers said.

http://edition.cnn.com/2017/08/09/health/nashville-mayor-son-death-autopsy/index.html

Max Barry, the twenty two-year-old son of Nashville Mayor Megan Barry, died last month from an accidental drug overdose complicated in part by morbid obesity, an autopsy report said Wednesday. He had several drugs in his system at the time of his death, including methadone, THC, cocaine, alprazolam and hydromorphine, according to the Jefferson County coroner’s report. The report said he also had other health problems, including hypertension, fatty liver disease and fatty deposits in two of his major arteries, and a reported “history of prescription drug abuse with withdrawal symptoms.” Since her son’s death on July twenty nine in Littleton, Colorado, Barry has spoken openly about his struggles with drugs, saying that transparency may help others confront similar problems. Barry said that her son had gone to rehab last year.

“He spent a month in rehab, which was a great gift. We were able to make that happen for him and make it happen quickly because we had access to health care,” said the mayor.

Max Barry graduated from the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, Washington.

Asked about policies to treat drug addiction and combat the opioid crisis, she mentioned the problem of overprescribing and the importance of a federal role in the fight.

 

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