The Health News Australia April 24 2018

  • The rate of ACL knee injuries among Australians younger than 25 has risen by 70% over the last 15 years. There are calls for a greater focus on agility training in kids sports to curb an alarming rise in serious knee injuries among teenagers and young adults. Research reveals Australia has the highest reported rates of ACL injury in the world.
  • One in four Australian children may have an undiagnosed eye condition and could be suffering at school and home as a result. But 32% of Aussie kids aged 14 and under have never had an eye test despite the recommended age for a first test being 3 years old. News Corp Australia can reveal research of more than 1,000 Australian parents conducted by YouGov and Galaxy with children under the age of 14 has found while 63% believe that sight is the most important sense for their child, they are more likely to take their children to a dentist appointment than an optometrist.
  • In Australia, up to 1 in 10 babies and 1 in 20 older children have a food allergy. In children with a food allergy, allergic reactions can be severe, and lead to hospitalisation and even, occasionally, death. But when it comes to baby wipes, parents can rest easy. Because, contrary to the headlines, the study being reported on did not provide evidence that using baby wipes increases a child’s risk of developing a food allergy. In fact, baby wipes weren’t analysed, nor did they feature, in the study at all. Plus, the study was in mice, not humans.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 24th of April 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

https://healthtimes.com.au/hub/physiotherapy/8/news/aap/an-alarming-rise-in-serious-knee-injuries-among-teenagers/3311/

The rate of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) knee injuries among Australians younger than twenty five has risen by seventy percent over the last fifteen years. There are calls for a greater focus on agility training in kids sports to curb an alarming rise in serious knee injuries among teenagers and young adults. Research reveals Australia has the highest reported rates of ACL injury in the world.
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The study by researchers at Griffith University, The University of Sydney and Knee Research Australia shows among this age group almost two hundred thousand primary ACL reconstructions were performed in Australia between two thousand and two thousand fifteen at an estimated cost of one hundred forty two million dollars a year. Lead researcher, Associate Professor Christopher Vertullo, director of Knee Research Australia, says longer sporting seasons, more intense training, a higher level of competition and a lack of free play contribute to the concerning rise in injuries.

He says “fifty to eighty percent” of ACL ruptures could be prevented by including twenty to thirty minutes of agility training three times a week to improve the ability to change the body’s position efficiently. ACL rupture is a common injury in sports such as AFL, rugby, netball, basketball, soccer or skiing.

https://www.perthnow.com.au/lifestyle/health-wellbeing/how-to-know-if-your-kids-need-an-eye-test-1-in-4-children-living-with-undiagnosed-eye-problems-ng-d994ef53c3edab5f3ed25a6e92c6f025

One in four Australian children may have an undiagnosed eye condition and could be suffering at school and home as a result. But thirty two percent of Aussie kids aged fourteen and under have never had an eye test despite the recommended age for a first test being three years old. News Corp Australia can reveal research of more than one thousand Australian parents conducted by YouGov and Galaxy with children under the age of fourteen has found while sixty three percent believe that sight is the most important sense for their child, they are more likely to take their children to a dentist appointment than an optometrist.

A third of parents who haven’t taken their child for an eye test thought they were too young — despite the recommended age for a first eye test being three-years-old. Cost could be a factor impacting parents’ choice with thirty one percent either thinking they will be charged for an eye test or not knowing if it will cost them. This is despite most optometrists bulk-billing eye checks.

Naomi Barber, senior optometrist at SpecSavers, who commissioned the research, said children’s eyes were constantly changing. She said up to one in four Australian kids could be living with an undiagnosed eye condition.
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A spokesman for Health Minister Greg Hunt said more than ninety four percent of all optometry services were bulk-billed in two thousand sixteen and two thousand seventeen — however the spokesman would not comment specifically on how many of those were for children.
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The main reasons why parents have not taken their child for an eye test are because they don’t think there is anything wrong with their eyes at forty eight percent, they’ve never really thought about it at thirty eight percent and because they think their child is too young to have their eyes tested at thirty one percent.

https://theconversation.com/research-check-can-baby-wipes-cause-childhood-food-allergies-94981

In Australia, up to one in ten babies and one in twenty older children have a food allergy. In children with a food allergy, allergic reactions can be severe, and lead to hospitalisation and even, occasionally, death. But when it comes to baby wipes, parents can rest easy. Because, contrary to the headlines, the study being reported on did not provide evidence that using baby wipes increases a child’s risk of developing a food allergy. In fact, baby wipes weren’t analysed, nor did they feature, in the study at all. Plus, the study was in mice, not humans.

The study was published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. Its main aim was to look at how damage to the skin barrier, as occurs with eczema, contributes to the development of food allergy. It is known from other studies that skin barrier damage might be an important factor in children’s food allergies. Infants with eczema are more likely to develop food allergies. Also children with some genetic mutations that affect the skin have more food allergies. Researchers used mice to model a type of food allergy in humans, known as IgE-mediated food allergy. People with this allergy develop “sensitisation” to certain foods, such as peanuts. Some of these sensitised people then develop an allergic reaction when they eat the food. At this stage, it is thought that sensitisation could occur in humans through skin exposure, but studies haven’t yet proven the link.

The researchers used newborn mice with genetic defects in skin barrier function genes and took several steps to cause the mice to develop reactions to peanut. They first applied sodium dodecyl sulfate, a chemical often found in soap, on the mouse’s skin, to stop the next solution from rolling off the skin. Then they applied drops containing peanut and environmental allergens found in house dust to their skin at regular intervals to cause “sensitisation”. They then gave the peanut orally. The researchers tested mice for reactions that may indicate food allergy, such as a drop in body temperature after oral peanut exposure. Environmental allergens from house dust were used because researchers have previously shown that house dust may contain peanut proteins.

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