The Health News Australia January 25 2018

  • According to UNSW researchers in educational psychology, students with well-developed and adaptive social and emotional behaviours are most likely to excel in school. The two-part study of 153,437 NSW kindergarten students shows that adaptive social and emotional behaviours in kindergarten correspond with better results in school years later. The UNSW researchers, in partnership with the University of Sydney, assessed children on their cooperative, socially responsible, helpful, anxious, and aggressive-disruptive behaviours in kindergarten.
  • The WA government is funding a free meningococcal vaccine for children aged 1 to 4 after 6 people died following a spike in cases last year. A total of 46 WA cases of meningococcal were reported in 2017, double the number in 2016 and the most in any year since 2015, with 3 more cases diagnosed so far this year. The vaccine, available free from Tuesday, will inoculate children against the A, C, W and Y serogroups of the disease.
  • A Vietnam veteran has created a free bush retreat to help veterans find peace, purpose and a place to talk. Roger Dwyer established Camp Gregory Veterans Retreat when he realised ex-service personnel sometimes needed to get away from it all and talk to others with shared experiences. The bush camp nestled on the bank of the Gregory River, halfway between Hervey Bay and Bundaberg in Queensland, has been developed to help veterans combat PTSD.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 25th of January 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

https://newsroom.unsw.edu.au/news/social-affairs/social-and-emotional-skills-linked-better-student-learning

According to University of New South Wales researchers in educational psychology, students with well-developed and adaptive social and emotional behaviours are most likely to excel in school.  The two-part study of one hundred fifty three thousand four hundred thirty seven New South Wales kindergarten students shows that adaptive social and emotional behaviours in kindergarten correspond with better results in school years later.

The UNSW researchers, in partnership with the University of Sydney, assessed children on their cooperative, socially responsible, helpful, anxious, and aggressive-disruptive behaviours in kindergarten. These ratings were then used to identify social and emotional behavioural profiles to understand how students tend to fare on the five behaviours. Children in profiles that were higher in cooperative, socially responsible, and helpful behaviours in kindergarten were more likely to achieve better results in grades three and five. Children in profiles with higher levels of aggressive-disruptive behaviours – such as physical violence, excluding other children, or temper tantrums – tended to receive lower results.

Children who were in profiles higher in anxious behaviours had less obvious outcomes, but often achieved slightly lower school results, possibly because they tended to also exhibit lower helpful and cooperative behaviours. This may have been due to anxiety making socialisation with other students more difficult. Study co-author Doctor Rebecca Collie, a Scientia Fellow and Senior Lecturer in Educational Psychology at UNSW, said these new results added to growing evidence that children’s social and emotional behaviours in the early years were powerful predictors of later outcomes, making it essential to teach social and emotional skills and behaviours from an early age.

https://healthtimes.com.au/hub/public-health/50/news/aap/free-meningococcal-vaccine-for-wa-children/3133/

The West Australian government is funding a free meningococcal vaccine for children aged one to four after six people died following a spike in cases last year.

A total of forty six WA cases of meningococcal were reported in two thousand seventeen, double the number in two thousand sixteen and the most in any year since two thousand fifteen, with three more cases diagnosed so far this year. The vaccine, available free from Tuesday, will inoculate children against the A, C, W and Y serogroups of the disease. The state-government also funds a vaccination program through schools and universities for teens aged between seventeen and nineteen.

Health Minister Roger Cook says vaccination funding is the responsibility of the federal government, but his government couldn’t sit back and let the disease “wreak havoc” on the community.

A single shot of the vaccine will cover a child for about three to four years. It will cost the state five point seven million dollars for one year. Without the subsidy, parents can shell out more than one hundred dollars for a single shot of the vaccine.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-01-18/camp-gregory-bush-camp-helps-veterans-with-ptsd/9335350

A Vietnam veteran has created a free bush retreat to help veterans find peace, purpose and a place to talk. Roger Dwyer established Camp Gregory Veterans Retreat when he realised ex-service personnel sometimes needed to get away from it all and talk to others with shared experiences. The bush camp nestled on the bank of the Gregory River, halfway between Hervey Bay and Bundaberg in Queensland, has been developed to help veterans combat Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder or PTSD.
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He said: “A lot of veterans suffer with PTSD and one of the issues is the fact that they can’t stay in closed rooms and handle noises.” The camp has been under development for seven years, and has largely been built by visiting veterans.

The retreat is located on a sixteen-hectare property owned by Mister Dwyer and allows for veterans to bring their own caravans and tents. The retreat also offers accommodation facilities in the form of dongas, a camp kitchen, bathrooms, and other shared facilities.

Mister Dwyer said he has been motivated to create a retreat not just for his own generation of Vietnam veterans, but for veterans of all ages and conflicts. He said his concern for the younger veterans was increasing due to the current high rate of suicide among returned military personnel. He added:  “In two thousand sixteen there were eighty military suicides, in two thousand seventeen there were eighty four suicides, and these are all young people.”

He was thankful that PTSD was now acknowledged by the Federal Government, but believed more work needed to be done to support those suffering from the disorder.

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