The Health News United Kingdom April 2 2018

  • Under new laws, advanced paramedics in England will be able to prescribe medicines to people who do not need hospital treatment. Up to 7 out of 10 people currently seen by advanced care paramedics may need help – but not a hospital visit. Paramedics only have a limited ability to supply medicines at the moment but will now be able to do this without delay or the patient seeing their GP. Around 700 paramedics are going to be trained, to qualify them to write prescriptions.
  • Researchers have found that just 2 weeks of normal office life without exercise can put people on the path to diabetes. Sitting at a desk all day, driving to work and lazing on the sofa at weekends triggered ill health in all the participants of a new study. The research team at Liverpool University warned that Britons’ increasingly inactive lives could damage their health in the long term, potentially leading to serious conditions such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease and strokes.
  • Teenagers in Great Britain are being asked to take part in a study to learn if immunising them against meningitis B could protect them and other people. The NHS wants twenty four thousand to take part in the Oxford Vaccine Group’s Be On The Team trial, which is helped by National Institute for Health Research funding. Bacteria at the back of the throat can cause meningitis and the study will see if vaccination can stop this happening. The trial will take place in 4 waves of recruitment over the next 2 years.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 2nd of April 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-43572302

Under new laws, advanced paramedics in England will be able to prescribe medicines to people who do not need hospital treatment. Up to seven out of ten people currently seen by advanced care paramedics may need help – but not a hospital visit. Paramedics only have a limited ability to supply medicines at the moment but will now be able to do this without delay or the patient seeing their general practitioner. Rachel Power, The Patients Association chief executive, called it “good news”. She added: “It will make it easier for them to receive treatment at home, eliminate the need to see a second professional in many cases, and reduce the need for transportation into hospital that isn’t clinically necessary.”
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Some advanced paramedics already work in GP practices, where they usually look after urgent same-day patient requests, including some home visits. And others who work in emergency departments will also be able to prescribe medicines, allowing doctors to see more needy patients. Around seven hundred paramedics are going to be trained, to qualify them to write prescriptions. Gemma Walsh, an advanced paramedic who specialises in urgent care, said the ability for paramedics to be able to prescribe was a “fantastic development for our profession”. She said it would help to reduce pressure on GPs and hospitals and would speed up the time it takes for patients to receive treatments.
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An NHS England spokesperson said: “Increasing the range of treatments offered by paramedics closer to people’s homes is another significant step in transforming emergency care, as ambulance clinicians increasingly become part of community urgent treatment services.”

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2018/03/29/just-two-weeks-sedentary-office-working-risks-diabetes-new/

Researchers have found that just two weeks of normal office life without exercise can put people on the path to diabetes. Sitting at a desk all day, driving to work and lazing on the sofa at weekends triggered ill health in all the participants of a new study. The research team at Liverpool University warned that Britons’ increasingly inactive lives could damage their health in the long term, potentially leading to serious conditions such as type two diabetes, heart disease and strokes. However, the experiment also showed that the ill-effects can be reversed with simple steps like taking the stairs instead of the lift, getting off the bus a stop early and going to the supermarket instead of shopping online.
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Researchers followed forty five people with an average age of thirty six who did not regularly do any active exercise like jogging or going to the gym but all walked at least ten thousand steps a day as part of their daily lives. They were asked to become inactive for two weeks. This involved getting public transport or driving to work, taking lifts or escalators instead of stairs, cutting their steps down to around one thousand five hundred a day and spending the weekend at home, mainly watching TV or playing computer games.
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After two weeks, tests showed participants had increases in their fat levels and waist sizes, and showed signs of muscle loss and lower cardiorespiratory fitness. Their bodies were also less able to respond to the hormone insulin – a symptom which can be a precursor to developing diabetes. After participants had resumed their normal activity levels for fourteen days, the negative effects were reversed.

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-43554595

Teenagers in Great Britain are being asked to take part in a study to learn if immunising them against meningitis B could protect them and other people. The NHS wants twenty four thousand to take part in the Oxford Vaccine Group’s Be On The Team trial, which is helped by National Institute for Health Research funding. Bacteria at the back of the throat can cause meningitis and the study will see if vaccination can stop this happening. The trial will take place in four waves of recruitment over the next two years.

Each of the teenagers who chooses to participate, in Year twelve in England or the equivalent in Scotland and Wales, will be put into one of three groups of eight thousand participants and will receive two doses of one of two vaccines. Two of these groups will be in the programme for a year, with the third, which will act as a control group, taking part for eighteen months. The recruitment started this week and is planned to work around school holidays and exams, taking place in March-April and September-October this year and in two thousand nineteen. Meningitis B is a bacterial infection that most often affects children below the age of one. It is the most common form of the condition in the UK. Since two thousand fifteen, children under twelve months have been offered the vaccination. There are about one thousand two hundred meningitis B cases each year in the UK.
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Doctor Matthew Snape, a consultant paediatrician at the Oxford Vaccine Group, told the BBC: “We’ve had great enthusiasm from the schools we have approached, with the majority of Year twelve students interested in taking part.”
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Following the death of two-year-old Faye Burdett in two thousand sixteen, a petition set up to ask for all children to be routinely vaccinated attracted eight hundred twenty thousand signatures.

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