The Health News – 31 May 2017

Overview:

• In an interview with GQ magazine, Prince William opened up about his struggle over his mother Princess Diana’s death. For the past year Prince William and Catherine have been speaking up about mental health issues. In a video the pair made for Heads Together, along with Prince Harry, all three speak about why it was important to them and how speaking about such issues could work like “medicine”.

• The 2008 death of Graham Rollbusch, 70, at the Makk and McLeay nursing home is under investigation by coroner Mark Johns. Registered nurse Danilo Valdez Laurente worked on the night of Mr Rollbusch’s death, and told the coroner it was usual practice to have three staff on a night shift. When questioned by Mr Johns about how Mr Palmer was monitored while all three staff members conducted rounds, Mr Laurente conceded they could not watch him continuously.

• The suicide rate for men aged 85 and older was 39.3 per 100,000 people. In women of the same age, it was 5.7. Monash University Professor Paul Komesaroff said a lack of support was partly to blame for poor mental health in many older Australians.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  31st of May 2017. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-05-30/prince-william-speaks-out-about-mental-health-in-gq-interview/8571916

Australian mental health advocates are optimistic Prince William may have helped to spark a wider conversation about dealing with grief.

In an interview with GQ magazine, the Prince opened up about his struggle over his mother Princess Diana’s death.

During the interview he spoke about the raw grief he felt 20 years ago when he learned of her death.

It follows an interview earlier in the year where Prince Harry spoke about his “mental chaos” while dealing with grief over his mother’s death.

Prince William said he continued to find it difficult to talk about his grief openly.

He said “smashing the taboo” around mental health was the ultimate goal of his decision to team up the mental health charity Heads Together and their campaign.

“People can’t access services till they feel less ashamed, so we must tackle the taboo, the stigma, for goodness sake, this is the 21st century,” he said …

For the past year Prince William and Catherine have been speaking up about mental health issues.

In a video the pair made for Heads Together, along with Prince Harry, all three speak about why it was important to them and how speaking about such issues could work like “medicine”.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-05-30/oakden-inquest-told-too-few-night-staff-rostered/8573140

Oakden mental health nursing home had too few staff to watch all patients at night, a former nurse has told the inquest into an Adelaide man’s death after he was attacked by another resident with dementia.

The 2008 death of Graham Rollbusch, 70, at the Makk and McLeay nursing home is under investigation by coroner Mark Johns.

The inquest was earlier told Mr Rollbusch was found face down in his room in a pool of his own blood and dementia patient Peter Palmer, 84, was found in a nearby alcove with blood on his hands.

He was charged with murder but died before a trial.

Registered nurse Danilo Valdez Laurente worked on the night of Mr Rollbusch’s death, and told the coroner it was usual practice to have three staff on a night shift.

The inquest previously heard Mr Palmer was known to be verbally and physically abusive towards staff and other residents and would wander around the ward at night.

Mr Laurente said a staff member would keep watch on Mr Palmer from the nurses’ station.

When questioned by Mr Johns about how Mr Palmer was monitored while all three staff members conducted rounds, Mr Laurente conceded they could not watch him continuously.

Mr Laurente was asked if enough staff were rostered on night shift and responded: “In my view, no.”

He said four or five more staff were needed at night.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-05-30/australian-men-aged-over-85-have-the-highest-rate-of-suicide/8569740

Australian men aged over 85 have the highest suicide rate in Australia, and more than double that of teenagers, Australian Bureau of Statistics 2015 data shows.

The suicide rate for men aged 85 and older was 39.3 per 100,000 people. In women of the same age, it was 5.7.

Among males aged 15-19 years old the suicide rate was 11.8 deaths per 100,000 people, but suicide accounted for 28.6 per cent of all deaths in that age group.

The highest female suicide rate was within the 45-49 year age group, at 10.4 deaths per 100,000. The lowest death rate for females was among those aged 65-69 years — 4.5 deaths.

Monash University Professor Paul Komesaroff said a lack of support was partly to blame for poor mental health in many older Australians.

“Elderly people have often been blamed for soaking up disproportionate quantities of our healthcare resources,” he said.

“There’s been a reduction in the support that has been made available for elderly people.”

He said many older Australians had a mindset that not being as productive as they once were meant they had little to live for.

“They may well express to their doctor the view that they don’t want care to be prolonged,” he said.

“Not because they fear losing their capabilities or their capacities, but because they don’t want to impose on the rest of society, it’s their sense of responsibility.

“And of course that’s a terrible tragedy because these are the people who have actually created the wealth.” [he said]

 

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