The Health News Untied Kingdom July 29 2017

Overview

  • A High Court judge has decided that terminally-ill Charlie Gard will be moved to a hospice and have his life support withdrawn soon after. His parents had wanted a private team to care for Charlie so they could have more time with him. Charlie’s parents stated that their final request was denied.
  • A record number of people in the UK are in work but at the same time, demand for mental health services is soaring. One in 4 adults in the UK experience a diagnosable mental health problem each year.
  • Prince William, Duke of Cambridge will complete his last shift as an air ambulance pilot on before returning to his full time job as a royal. The prince revealed last year that his first ‘call-out’ as an air ambulance pilot was to the suicide of a young man, a job that led him to think deeply about the pressures on individuals. This led him and his wife, Catherine to set up the mental health charity Heads Together.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 29th of July 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health New

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-40745988

Terminally-ill Charlie Gard will be moved to a hospice and have his life support withdrawn soon after, a High Court judge has decided. Great Ormond Street Hospital or GOSH said it was not in his best interests to spend a long time in a hospice. His parents had wanted a private team to care for Charlie so they could have more time with him. “GOSH have denied us our final wish,” his mother said. The judge approved a plan that will see Charlie die shortly after being moved.

Mister Justice Francis added that no details about when he would be moved and where could be made public. In a statement, the hospital said it deeply regretted “that profound and heartfelt differences” between Charlie’s doctors and parents have “had to be played out in court over such a protracted period”. Parents, Connie Yates and Chris Gard, and GOSH had until twelve o’clock British Summer Time to agree Charlie’s end-of-life care. However, an agreement was not reached by the noon deadline.

The parents’ lawyer, Grant Armstrong said they wanted to spend days with Charlie at a hospice before his death. But hospital bosses said they could not agree to the arrangement as his parents had not found a paediatric intensive care specialist. Commenting on the decision, Connie said: “We just want some peace with our son, no hospital, no lawyers, no courts, no media, just quality time with Charlie away from everything, to say goodbye to him in the most loving way. “Most people won’t ever have to go through what we have been through, we’ve had no control over our son’s life and no control over our son’s death.

“Despite us and our legal team working tirelessly to arrange this near impossible task, the judge has ordered against what we arranged and has agreed to what GOSH asked. “This subsequently gives us very little time with our son.”

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/craig-thorley/mental-health-workplace_b_17597900.html

Politicians of all stripes have set off on their summer holidays, recovering from the upheaval of a momentous spring in British politics. When they return in the autumn, we can expect Brexit to once again take top billing, as the Article fifty countdown clock ticks slowly on.

A few weeks ago, the Prime Minister used the publication of the government-commissioned Taylor Review to recommit to protect those affected by the changing nature of work. And in the autumn, another government-commissioned independent review (led by Lord Stevenson and Paul Farmer) will look to identify ways to support those who experience mental health problems at work.

A record number of people in the UK are in work. But at the same time, demand for mental health services is soaring. One in four adults in the UK experience a diagnosable mental health problem each year.We know that fulfilling employment can minimise the risk of developing poorer mental health, and that negative experiences of work can have the opposite effect.

It’s hard to imagine millennials choosing to be underemployed, overqualified or in low-pay.

But what are the implications of this changing world of work on millennials’ mental health and wellbeing? Newly-published analysis show that millennials in temporary work are twenty nine percent more likely to experience mental health problems than those in permanent work, while millennials in part-time work are forty three per cent more likely than those in full-time work to experience problems.

Millennials who are overqualified are thirty eight percent more likely to report being anxious or depressed than those who are graduates working in graduate-roles. And those in low-paid work are thirty one per cent more likely than those in higher-paid work to experience problems.This suggests that, for a significant number of young people, their experiences of the modern world of work would appear to be putting their mental health and wellbeing at greater risk.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/07/26/prince-williams-leaves-air-ambulance-service-deeply-influenced/

Prince William will complete his last shift as an air ambulance pilot on Thursday before returning to his full time job as a royal, bringing to an end a spell which has had a profound influence on his life. The Duke of Cambridge joined the East Anglian Air Ambulance service in March two thousand fifteen, after serving for nearly five years as a helicopter pilot with the Royal Air Force’s Search and Rescue Force, and began piloting his first operational missions in July that year. Since then he has carried out dozens of call-outs alongside his colleagues, attending road accidents, rescues and suicide attempts and landing his helicopter in residential gardens, carparks, beaches and roadsides across the region. The prince revealed last year that his first ‘call-out’ as an air ambulance pilot was to the suicide of a young man, a job that led him to think deeply about the pressures on individuals. It was this kind of event which shaped William and his wife Catherine’s commitment to highlighting the growing problem of mental health and led them to set up the charity Heads Together.

Prince William, who was based at Cambridge Airport, said he had been “staggered” to discover that suicide was the biggest killer of men under the age of forty five. Prince William stated “In some of my charity work I have come across issues like this before, and coupled with my air ambulance work where my first job was a male suicide, I realised starkly how big a problem we have in this country,” he said. “’It was really close to me on that first day and one of the guys told me on average there are five attempted suicides a day.”

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