The Health News United Kingdom March 12 2018

  • The number of people admitted to hospital with alcohol-related problems – such as serious liver disease, alcohol poisoning and cancer – has risen by almost 20% in 10 years to more than 300,000 last year. The biggest drinkers with health problems are aged 45 to 54 – people born in the 60s and 70s – accounting for 64,920 alcohol-related hospitalisations last year.  Figures released by Public Health England also show cases of liver cirrhosis have more than doubled to 9,680 last year.
  • Prostate recently overtook breast as the biggest cancer killer in the UK. The research and treatment of the disease are underfunded, and as such there are still huge numbers of fatalities. It affects the prostate which is a part of the male anatomy which secretes the alkaline milky fluid that makes up about 30% of a man’s semen. For this reason, it’s considered a mostly male cancer. Signs to look out for include: painful or frequent urination, or difficulty passing urine blood in your urine, or passing blood from your urethra painful sexual intercourse feeling of pressure behind the pubic bones abnormal menstrual cycle, or sudden changes to your menstrual cycle.
  • Hundreds of thousands of NHS patients are being wrongly accused of fraudulently claiming free prescriptions and are being threatened with fines. Data released under the Freedom of Information Act shows that 1,052,430 penalty notices were issued to patients in England in 2017 – about double the level in the previous year. The fines, which carry a maximum penalty of £100 and are issued to those who wrongly claim free medication, are issued after an NHS exemption certificate has expired.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 12th of March 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/930075/NHS-crisis-UK-health-alcohol-related-problems-cancer-liver-disease-norman-lamb-mp

The number of people admitted to hospital with alcohol-related problems – such as serious liver disease, alcohol poisoning and cancer – has risen by almost twenty percent in ten years to more than three hundred thousand last year. The biggest drinkers with health problems are aged forty five to fifty four – people born in the sixties and seventies – accounting for sixty four thousand nine hundred twenty alcohol-related hospitalisations last year.

Figures released by Public Health England also show cases of liver cirrhosis have more than doubled to nine thousand six hundred eighty last year. Shockingly, three thousand seven hundred sixty under-sixteens were admitted over alcohol-related health problems last year, as well as twenty two thousand seven hundred eighty people aged sixteen to twenty four.  Health issues include nerve problems, pancreatitis, cancers of the mouth, liver and breast, injuries and liver damage.
….
It revealed three hundred thirty seven thousand one hundred ten alcohol-related hospital admissions last year, compared to two hundred eighty seven thousand four hundred fifty in two thousand seven. Member of Parliament Norman Lamb, a former health secretary said: “These figures show the Government must get tougher on Britain’s dangerous relationship with alcohol.”

http://metro.co.uk/2018/03/07/can-women-get-prostate-cancer-7369247/

Prostate recently overtook breast as the biggest cancer killer in the UK. The research and treatment of the disease are underfunded, and as such there are still huge numbers of fatalities. It affects the prostate which is a part of the male anatomy which secretes the alkaline milky fluid that makes up about thirty percent of a man’s semen. For this reason, it’s considered a mostly male cancer.

While the prostate is only present in men, women have a ‘prostate gland’ of sorts too. The Skene’s gland is located just below the urethra in women, and serves the purpose of secreting fluid that lubricates the urethra (with some sources claiming that this may have antimicrobial properties). When females ejaculate, this fluid is released from the Skene’s gland. The main similarity with the male prostate in that they both produce prostate-specific antigen or PSA.

Although prostate cancer in men is somewhat common, Skene’s gland cancer is found in less than zero point zero zero three percent of all genital cancers in women. So while it is possible for females to get a form of prostate cancer, it’s extremely rare. It tends to occur in older women, and has links to human papillomavirus infection (HPV), smoking, and some hormonal medications. Signs to look out for include: painful or frequent urination, or difficulty passing urine blood in your urine, or passing blood from your urethra painful sexual intercourse feeling of pressure behind the pubic bones abnormal menstrual cycle, or sudden changes to your menstrual cycle.

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/mar/10/nhs-falsely-accuses-thousands-patients-prescription-fraud

Hundreds of thousands of NHS patients are being wrongly accused of fraudulently claiming free prescriptions and are being threatened with fines. Data released under the Freedom of Information Act shows that one million fifty two thousand four hundred thirty penalty notices were issued to patients in England in two thousand seventeen – about double the level in the previous year.

The fines, which carry a maximum penalty of one hundred pounds and are issued to those who wrongly claim free medication, are issued after an NHS exemption certificate has expired.
But the data confirms that three hundred forty two thousand eight hundred eighty two penalty notices were subsequently withdrawn because the patient was entitled to the free prescription.
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Part of the problem stems from patients moving home and failing to update their records.
The NHS Business Services Authority, the agency in charge of issuing the fines, said it was continually reviewing its data-matching process and making improvements to ensure eligible patients were not wrongly pursued. It said it was also trying to educate patients on the importance of keeping the details on both their general practitioner records and their exemption or prescription prepayment certificates up to date.

Alison O’Brien, head of loss recovery services at the authority said: “The NHS loses millions each year through fraudulent and incorrect claims for free prescriptions.On behalf of NHS England, and in discussion with the Department of Health and Social Care, the NHS Business Services Authority checks claims randomly and retrospectively to appropriately recover funds and return them to NHS services.”

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