The Health News United Kingdom August 15 2017

Overview

  • More than 600 hundred children and teenagers are being treated for type two diabetes in England and Wales. The youngest children affected are aged between 5 and 9. Type 2 diabetes in children is a serious condition which can lead to long-term health complications such as heart disease, kidney failure and blindness.
  • Arthritis cases have more than doubled since World War II. In the UK around 10 million people have arthritis, the most common of which is osteoarthritis, which affects 8 million people.
  • As a child you depended on your early relationships for basic survival. If you were nurtured, you felt safe and learned you were loved and lovable. This is called secure attachment. However, early childhood attachments are not always healthy or secure, and this can be where problems start.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 15th of August 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-40900269

More than six hundred children and teenagers are being treated for type two diabetes in England and Wales, and the rise in cases is a “hugely disturbing trend”, local councils are warning. The figures come from a report by child health experts which found one hundred ten more cases among under-nineteens in two thousand fifteen to two thousand sixteen than two years previously. The youngest children affected are aged between five and nine.

Council leaders said urgent action on childhood obesity was needed. The Local Government Association, which represents councils in England and Wales, added that government cuts to public health budgets had affected their ability to tackle the issue. Being overweight is the biggest risk factor for developing type two diabetes, and three-quarters of these children were obese. With child obesity rates in England rising – but now by a smaller amount than they have been – it’s no surprise more children are being treated for the condition.

In primary schools in England, one in ten children in Reception and one in five children in year six were classified as obese in two thousand fifteen and two thousand sixteen.

Type two diabetes in children is a serious condition which can lead to long-term health complications such as heart disease, kidney failure and blindness.

Children from Asian and black ethnic backgrounds were particularly affected, and children who lived in deprived areas were more likely to have type two. There were twice as many girls than boys with the condition and most of the cases were among fifteen to nineteen year olds.

Because type two diabetes can be more aggressive in children than in adults, it is important to manage the condition carefully in order to prevent any health problems occurring.

https://inews.co.uk/essentials/news/health/arthritis-cases-double-since-world-war-two-ageing-society/

Arthritis cases have more than doubled since World War two, but the reason is not simply down to an ageing society according to new research. Scientists at Harvard University said the average American is now twice as likely to be diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis than in the nineteen thirties. More than two thousand skeletons from cadaveric and archaeological collections across the US were examined in a study first of its kind to definitively show that knee osteoarthritis prevalence has dramatically increased in recent decades. “Once someone has knee osteoarthritis, it creates a vicious circle. People become less active, which can lead to a host of other problems, and their health ends up declining at a more rapid rate.” Daniel Lieberman, study senior author of the research, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, also upends the popular belief that the condition is a wear-and-tear disease that is widespread today simply because more people are living longer and are more commonly obese. “We were able to show, for the first time, that this pervasive cause of pain is actually twice as common today than even in the recent past,” said Ian Wallace, one of the researchers. “But the even bigger surprise is that it’s not just because people are living longer or getting fatter, but for other reasons likely related to our modern environments.” Understanding the disease is important not only because it is extremely prevalent today, affecting an estimated one-third of Americans over age sixty, but also because it is responsible for more disability than almost any other musculoskeletal disorder, the scientists said. In the UK around ten million people have arthritis.

http://www.edp24.co.uk/features/mental-health-takeover-childhood-has-important-impact-on-future-mental-health-1-5147832

You may think that your childhood is in the past and mostly forgotten; that your previous relationships and experiences have not impacted who you are now, how you see yourself and ultimately your mental health. You may need to think again, as there is a growing body of research that says our childhood experiences have serious consequences on both your mental and your physical health. As a child you depended on your early relationships for basic survival.

If you were nurtured, you felt safe and learned you were loved and lovable. This is called secure attachment. However, early childhood attachments are not always healthy or secure, and this can be where problems start. If your childhood was affected by developmental trauma – also known as adverse childhood experiences – or even if your parents or teachers were angry or critical, you would react as if you were stressed.

Your human survival system would release chemicals into your brain and body that would impact your healthy development. As children or teenagers, seemingly innocent situations may have caused you to be agitated and want to get away or flight, get angry or fight, or to stay still until the event ended or person went away or freeze. These experiences and relationships can be set into your unconscious memory and often affect you into your adult life.When you feel upset by experiences or relationships you may respond in similar ways.

 

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