The Health News Australia November 28 2017

  • More than half of Australian parents say they wouldn’t know how to resuscitate their child if they stopped breathing so Westpac is taking action. Drowning deaths peaked at 49 nationally last year. Almost 56% of parents with kids aged between 2 and 8 said they wouldn’t know how to do CPR in the event of an emergency, a survey has found, despite children under 4  accounting for 42% of non-fatal drownings.
  • Women can manage their menopausal symptoms without the use of hormones but not all alternative therapies work. A review of all the evidence on non-hormonal treatments for menopause has found Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) and hypnosis are effective treatments. Hot flushes are the most common and the most problematic symptom of menopause. And while they are a physiological response, the evidence suggests the mind can help alleviate the experience for women.
  • A new push for assisted dying could see the practice legalised in the Northern Territory as early as next year. The Greens Party has announced it will next year attempt to overturn a federal law that prevents territories from legalising voluntary assisted dying. Euthanasia has long been on the Northern Territory’s to-do list, since the power to regulate the practice was stripped two decades ago.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 28th of November 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/health/the-rescue-rashie-printed-with-cpr-instructions-aims-to-educate-parents-on-resuscitation/news-story/fca2b8f76871526273251e73ef4fab77

More than half of Australian parents say they wouldn’t know how to resuscitate their child if they stopped breathing so Westpac is taking action. Drowning deaths peaked at forty nine nationally last year, so the time is right for the Rescue Rashie, a children’s rash vest printed with step-by-step instructions for how to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation.
Almost fifty six per cent of parents with kids aged between two and eight said they wouldn’t know how to do CPR in the event of an emergency, a survey has found, despite children under four accounting for forty two per cent of non-fatal drownings. Developed with the help of paediatric first aid training and awareness organisation CPR Kids, the bright red rash vests provide thorough instructions for how to save a child’s life. They are also a constant reminder to parents about water safety, said CPR kids founder Sarah Hunstead. Miss Hunstead said
“Adults are nervous about what to do (in the event of a child losing consciousness) but the Rescue Rashie puts the instructions right on their child’s chest.”

Two thirds of parents did not know the correct compression to breath ratio (thirty to two) for CPR, the survey of one thousand parents also found. Hunstead said it is important to call an ambulance but, especially in a drowning accident, you cannot wait for help. Drowning deaths in children under five jumped by thirty two per cent nationally in two thousand sixteen and two thousand seventeen. Almost three hundred people drowned in the twelve months to June thirty — almost twenty per cent of those in December, according to the Royal Lifesaving Society.
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Pure Profile conducted the nationwide survey of one thousand Australian parents who have children between the ages of two and eight years old.

https://www.9news.com.au/health/2017/11/24/13/31/therapy-can-manage-menopausal-hot-flushes

Women can manage their menopausal symptoms without the use of hormones but not all alternative therapies work. A review of all the evidence on non-hormonal treatments for menopause has found Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and hypnosis are effective treatments.

Professor Martha Hickey from the Royal Women’s Hospital and University of Melbourne, who led the review published in the British Medical Journal, says CTP, in particular, should be considered by doctors as an option to treat women going through menopause.
….
Hot flushes are the most common and the most problematic symptom of menopause. And while they are a physiological response, the evidence suggests the mind can help alleviate the experience for women.

Lifestyle changes such as exercise and relaxation can improve general health, although the review did not directly improve hot flushes. Most common over-the-counter ‘natural’ preparations or products sold online do not work, warned Professor Hickey. She said:  “There is a lot of information on the internet about treatments for menopause, but many of these are not supported by high quality research.” Professor Hickey noted that there is no advice, however, against taking hormones.
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-11-27/assisted-dying-could-be-legalised-in-nt-by-2018/9194868

A new push for assisted dying could see the practice legalised in the Northern Territory as early as next year. That is – if the Greens get their way. The party has announced it will next year attempt to overturn a federal law that prevents territories from legalising voluntary assisted dying. The recent legislation which passed in Victoria is the first step towards a national bill, according to Greens leader Richard Di Natale. He said: “We could immediately overturn the ban that the Federal Parliament put on laws that allow the Australian Capital Territory and Northern Territory to implement legislation.”

The private bill is co-sponsored by Australian Capital Territory Labor senator Kay Gallagher, and the Greens will move to bring on debate in two thousand eighteen. Euthanasia has long been on the Northern Territory’s to-do list, since the power to regulate the practice was stripped two decades ago. But with Victoria passing laws last month and the Voluntary Assisted Dying bill struggling in New South Wales, the issue has taken over the national agenda.
Chief Minister of the Northern Territory Michael Gunner would be pleased with the push.
He recently penned a letter to the Prime Minister demanding power to introduce laws be reinstated

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