The Health News Australia July 28 2017

Overview

  • The Heart of Australia cardiology clinic has received a one million dollar donation from a family who wished to remain anonymous. The Heart of Australia (Heart Bus) was founded by engineer turned cardiologist Rolph Gomes, who fitted out a 25 metre semi-trailer with the same specialised equipment found in a city cardiology practice. Each month the truck travels 8,000 kilometers as it visits 12 regional towns to provide endocrinology and some respiratory services.
  • The Federal Government has confirmed that China has temporarily banned beef imports from 6 Australian meatworks. Trade Minister Steven Ciobo aid the ban related to Chinese concern about labelling non-compliance. There is no suggestion health or food safety issues are involved.
  • The Commonwealth Bank has come under fire from disability advocates for its nationwide rollout of EFTPOS machines which they say are inaccessible to blind and vision-impaired people. Blind Citizens Australia is now calling on the bank to stop rolling out the machines, until the technology is able to be used by all people — with or without a disability.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 28th of July 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health New

http://www.thesenior.com.au/health/heart-bus-that-comes-to-town-gets-1m-boost/

People living in outback Queensland will benefit from increased access to specialised medical care following a heartwarming gesture by a philanthropic family. The Heart of Australia cardiology clinic has received a one million dollar donation from a family who wished to remain anonymous. One family member told the ABC’s Australian Story the donation was made to honour their late father’s love of the bush and belief that access to doctors in remote areas was vital. The Heart of Australia – colloquially known as the Heart Bus – was founded by engineer turned cardiologist Rolph Gomes, who fitted out a twenty five-metre semi-trailer with the same specialised equipment found in a city cardiology practice. Each month the truck travels eight thousand kilometers as it visits twelve regional towns. It also provides endocrinology and some respiratory services.

Doctor Gomes said The Heart of Australia would use the donation to buy and outfit a second truck and would also look at incorporating other specialist services. ‘’You could never set up as a specialist in some of these areas because of the populations,” he said.

“If you go out to these areas and speak to the locals often they will say ‘We used to have a specialist in the area but they retired’. You hear these stories again and again.” Doctor Gomes founded the service because he saw lots of research being carried out into the lack of access to specialist services in rural Australia, but nobody actually doing anything about it. He hopes the new truck will be ready early next year.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/rural/2017-07-26/china-orders-halt-some-beef-exports-australia/8745644

China has temporarily banned beef imports from six Australian meatworks, the Federal Government has confirmed. Australia was made aware of the ban on Tuesday, and Trade Minister Steven Ciobo told the ABC he intended to work closely and constructively with industry and China to resolve the issue as quickly as possible.

The ABC understands the affected abattoirs are in Queensland and NSW, and include two facilities owned by Australia’s largest meat processor JBS. Other companies affected are Kilcoy Pastoral, Australian Country Choice, the Northern Rivers Co-operative at Casino, and Thomas Food. Mister Ciobo said the ban related to Chinese concern about labelling non-compliance. There is no suggestion health or food safety issues are involved. The trade minister said “This is obviously a very material situation and we’ve got, potentially, very significant amounts of trade involved in this and so it’s a matter that I’m very mobilised on, my team, my office, as well as our embassy in China.”

Mister Ciobo also stated that Australia and China had a strong relationship that “sees us work through irritants”, such as Australia’s recent ban on prawn imports. “We intend to engage in a very constructive way,” Mister Ciobo said, and sought to reassure the beef industry the Government would adopt a very “proactive” approach.

The Australian Meat Industry Council confirmed it was working with the Department of Agriculture through diplomatic channels on the issue. There are shipments currently on the water. The ABC understands the Australian industry believes it has resolved the labelling issues, and the Government is hopeful it can resolve the issue before those ships arrive in China.

But Australian exporters are also now confronted with a new competitor in the market as China opens up to US beef imports for the first time in thirteen years.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-07-28/blind-groups-push-for-solution-to-inaccesible-eftpos-terminals/8751366

The Commonwealth Bank has come under fire from disability advocates for its nationwide rollout of Electronic funds transfer at point of sale machines which they say are inaccessible to blind and vision-impaired people. Groups say blind people can’t use terminals because they don’t have tactile keypad. Blind Citizens Australia calling on the bank to stop rolling out machines. About seventy five thousand Albert touchscreen terminals are now in use around Australia, as point-of-sale EFTPOS devices at many businesses, such as coffee shops, boutiques and restaurants.Unlike other EFTPOS machines, the touchscreen tablets do not have a tactile keypad, meaning blind people cannot independently use them.

Blind Citizens Australia is now calling on the bank to stop rolling out the machines, until the technology is able to be used by all people — with or without a disability.

Executive officer of Blind Citizens Australia Emma Bennison said the organisation is receiving complaints from members every week, saying control over their finances has been compromised.”It is a point-of-sale device, an EFTPOS device which has no buttons on it … it has a touch screen,” Miss Bennison said.

She also said “So when you go to your local coffee shop, or your local restaurant, or perhaps your clothing retailer, it’s very common these days to walk up to the counter and find that you can’t enter your pin number independently if you are a blind person.”

 

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