The Health News Australia May 1 2018

  • Australia is now one of the fattest nations on Earth. 60% of us are overweight or obese, and by 2025 that figure will rise to eighty percent. Despite this, Australia still has no national obesity strategy. There are 2 key federal programs — the Healthy Food Partnership to encourage healthy eating, and the Health Star rating, a front-of-pack labelling system. But the rules for these 2 initiatives have been set by committees made up of government and public health advocates, as well as food industry representatives. So far, the Beverages Council has been extremely successful in preventing any talk of a tax on sugary drinks becoming a reality in Australia.
  • Infectious disease experts warn rates of the human parechoviruses (HPeV) have reached “epidemic” levels in Australia, causing severe complications among babies. The number of babies suffering severe complications from an emerging infection is on the rise in Australia, infectious disease experts are warning. There are no effective antiviral therapies for HPeV, and treatment is primarily the management of complications.
  • Tighter regulations for cosmetic service providers have been recommended following the death of a woman after a botched breast procedure in Sydney. The state’s health department on Saturday released the report ordered by Health Minister Brad Hazzard last year. It came after 35-year-old salon owner Jean Huang died in August following a breast filler procedure at the Medi Beauty Laser and Contour Clinic.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-04-30/big-sugar-and-the-big-flaw-in-australias-health-programs/9707204

 

Australia is now one of the fattest nations on Earth. Sixty percent of the population is overweight or obese, and by two thousand twenty five that figure will rise to eighty percent. Despite this, Australia still has no national obesity strategy. There are two key federal programs — the Healthy Food Partnership to encourage healthy eating, and the Health Star rating, a front-of-pack labelling system. But the rules for these two initiatives have been set by committees made up of government and public health advocates, as well as food industry representatives.

According to one insider who spoke to Four Corners, “the reality is that industry is … making most of the policy”, and public health advocates are only included “so we can have the least-worst solution”. Companies like Coca-Cola, Pepsico, Unilever, Nestle and Kelloggs have a seat at the table setting the policies that shape consumption of their own sugar-laced products.

As Australia’s obesity and diabetes rates continue to soar, public health advocates have told Four Corners the industry has been obstructing and delaying policy outcomes that would lead to better health. And they have likened their tactics to those deployed by the tobacco industry. Executive manager of the Obesity Policy Coalition Jane Martin said the food industry shouldn’t even be inside the committees setting food policy and regulation. She added: “Industry should be consulted around what policies should be implemented, but they shouldn’t have a role in deciding what they are.”

….
So far, the Beverages Council has been extremely successful in preventing any talk of a tax on sugary drinks becoming a reality in Australia. In its  two thousand sixteen Annual Report, the Beverages Council admitted to spending a “vast amount of resources” lobbying against a sugar tax. The council boasted of its success at “keeping the topic of a tax off the table from both of the major political parties”. There are twenty eight countries in the world that tax sugar-sweetened drinks and the Australian Medical Association wants Australia to join the list.

….

https://healthtimes.com.au/hub/diseases/24/news/aap/infectious-disease-experts-warn-about-a-new-virus-epidemic-making-kids-very-ill/3320/

 

Infectious disease experts warn rates of the human parechoviruses (HPeV) have reached “epidemic” levels in Australia, causing severe complications among babies. The experts wrote in the Medical Journal of Australia: “Rates of HPeV have reached “epidemic” levels and infants and children who contract the infection need closer medical attention by doctors and ongoing follow-up.”

Most of these infections cause no or mild symptoms, including gastroenteritis or influenza-like illness.

However some HPeV strains such as HPeVthree are associated with more severe infections, including encephalitis and sepsis – blood poisoning. Children under three-to-six months are particularly vulnerable to HPeV, which has been re-emerging every two years since two thousand thirteen.  Last year more than two hundred infants were admitted to hospital as a result of HPeV infection.
….
The experts say infants with the serious infection often appear red, hot and “angry”. The authors state: “HPeVthree disease can be severe with up to twenty to fifty percent of admitted patients with sepsis-like illness requiring intensive care admission.”
….
There are no effective antiviral therapies for HPeV, and treatment is primarily the management of complications.

….

https://www.9news.com.au/health/2018/04/28/09/41/nsw-cosmetic-procedures-need-more-rules

 

Tighter regulations for cosmetic service providers have been recommended following the death of a woman after a botched breast procedure in Sydney. The state’s health department on Saturday released the report ordered by Health Minister Brad Hazzard last year. It came after thirty five-year-old salon owner Jean Huang died in August following a breast filler procedure at the Medi Beauty Laser and Contour Clinic.

The document makes nine recommendations including a new offence for medical practitioners who carry out services in unlicensed facilities. It’s also called for tighter regulations around the prescribing, use, storage, access and administration of medicines commonly used in the procedures. Chief Health Officer Doctor Kerry Chant said no cosmetic procedure came without risks and urged anyone considering one to do their homework.

….
Police believe Ms Huang died from an overdose of the local anaesthetic Lignocaine and had high levels of the painkiller Tramadol in her system.
….

Liked it? Take a second to support healthprofessionalradio on Patreon!

0 Comments

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.