The Health News – 19 June 2017

Overview:

• Each year about 149 children die and 680,000 children aged 16 and younger are hospitalised from injuries.  Falls from playground equipment – which account for about a third of all hospitalisation – led to over 55,000 children hospitalised over the 10 years between 2002-2012. The 10-year study was published by Injury Prevention. It is the first time that injuries have been ranked.  Previously non-fatal rankings didn’t exist, said academics.

• Australian food businesses say new country of origin labelling laws, which require them to redesign packaging, will cost tens of millions of dollars. Government-commissioned research found consumers really cared about where less processed products such as seafood, tinned tomatoes and honey came from, so the Government came up with labels that tell shoppers how much of a product is made, packed or processed in Australia.

• The release of the long awaited Australian Law Reform Commission (ALRC) report into elder abuse is a substantial step forward in addressing physical, sexual, psychological, emotional and financial abuse of the elderly. A total of 14 out of the ALRC’s forty three recommendations are about improving aged care, in both residential settings and the home.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  19th of June 2017. Read by Wayne Bucklar. Health News

http://www.smh.com.au/national/health/playground-danger-injury-the-biggest-killer-of-australian-children-report-finds-20170609-gwo7dw.html

 

Injuries are the number one cause of death in children under 17, finds the first ever national study of nearly 700,000 hospitalisations over the past 10 years. That’s twice the number of hospital admissions as cancer, diabetes and heart disease combined.

Each year about 149 children die and 680,000 children aged 16 and younger are hospitalised from injuries.

For every severely injured child, at least another 13 children are hospitalised with minor or moderate injuries.

“The results are so alarming. It is clear we need to do something,” said Professor Kate Curtis, a co-author of the report and a professor of emergency and trauma nursing at Sydney University and a clinician academic in the Illawarra Shoalhaven Health District.

It took four years for Professor Curtis and co-author Professor Rebecca Mitchell from Macquarie University to get approval to access the data from state and federal governments collated in the injury report, which was funded by The Day of Difference Foundation.

Falls from playground equipment – which account for about a third of all hospitalisation – led to over 55,000 children hospitalised over the 10 years between 2002-2012.

Nearly half of all parents of critically injured children developed post traumatic stress disorder, the report found.

The 10-year study was published by Injury Prevention. It is the first time that injuries have been ranked.  Previously non-fatal rankings didn’t exist, said academics.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/rural/2017-06-15/country-of-orgin-labelling-costing-food-businesses-millions/8619348

Australian food businesses say new country of origin labelling laws, which require them to redesign packaging, will cost tens of millions of dollars.

New labels to show how much of a product is from Australia will be compulsory from July two thousand eighteen, but some smaller producers are outraged that highly processed foods and drinks are exempt.

Government-commissioned research found consumers really cared about where less processed products such as seafood, tinned tomatoes and honey came from, so the Government came up with labels that tell shoppers how much of a product is made, packed or processed in Australia.

Federal Industry Minister Arthur Sinodinos said the new labels would give consumers confidence to know where what they were consuming was coming from, and a clear indication of what was Australian and what was not.

Food South Australia chief executive Catherine Sayer said the overall cost to Australian businesses would be “millions and millions of dollars”, none of which would be passed on to consumers.

Some businesses have already changed their labels, but others claim the process is proving time consuming, confusing and costly.

Pam Brook, who makes Brookfarm muesli in Byron Bay, estimated that redesigning her 70 different packages would cost about half a million dollars.

Other producers said they would have to use conservative estimates of how much of their product could be called Australian because of the seasonality and availability of ingredients.

http://theconversation.com/elder-abuse-report-ignores-impact-on-peoples-health-75926

The release … of the long awaited Australian Law Reform Commission (ALRC) report into elder abuse is a substantial step forward in addressing physical, sexual, psychological, emotional and financial abuse of the elderly.

A total of 14 out of the ALRC’s forty three recommendations are about improving aged care, in both residential settings and the home.

Recommendations include improving the reporting and monitoring of serious incidents, such as sexual or physical abuse, with the process to be overseen by an independent body. While a reporting system will not prevent abuse, it is an essential and welcome first step.

Another recommendation addresses the perennial matter about quality of care and staffing in residential aged care services, including looking at optimal staffing models and levels.

Also not included in the report is whether providing inappropriate health care is a form of abuse. Examples include using resuscitation against someone’s wishes, or in residential aged care where a frail older person is restricted from walking alone even though they want independence and accept an increased risk of falling.

The ALRC report comes years after the World Health Organisation made its declaration for the global prevention of elder abuse.

… the greatest challenge in preventing elder abuse is equipping the law, health and aged care sectors to be better at screening, identifying and intervening to protect their rights. …

More research is also needed to inform decisions about social policy, aged care practice and resource allocation. This requires a dedicated, co-ordinated, multidisciplinary approach and the necessary technical expertise in aged care, law, health care, public health, injury prevention and public policy.

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