The Health News – 24 May 2017

Overview:

• Australian Red Cross Blood Service spokeswoman Jessica Willet said cold and flu viruses typically forced about 1,000 donors across the country to cancel their donation appointments over winter months. Ms Willet said 8,000 O-type blood donations were needed across the country in order to keep supplies at a safe level.

• In Central Australia, Ngangkari are supported by the medical community and their contribution to the mental wellbeing of Aboriginal people has been officially recognised. Alison ‘Tjulapi’ Carol, also a Ngangkari, credited the NPY women’s council with leading the charge for the Ngangkari’s esteemed place in the medical community of Central Australia. Tjulapi explained that Ngangkari have an invaluable role to play in bridging the divide between traditional and Western models of healthcare.

• Health authorities have urged passengers on a flight from Indonesia to Melbourne earlier this month to seek urgent medical attention after an unvaccinated child was diagnosed with measles. The three-year-old was admitted to hospital after arriving at Melbourne Airport on Garuda airlines flight GA 716 from Jakarta at 9:20am on May 13.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  24th of May 2017. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-05-23/o-blood-type-donation-urgently-needed-red-cross-says/8550764

Australians with O-type blood have been urged to make a blood donation with reserves falling to just two days’ supply.

Australian Red Cross Blood Service spokeswoman Jessica Willet said cold and flu viruses typically forced about 1,000 donors across the country to cancel their donation appointments over winter months.

“Type O blood is very important because O-negative is a universal-type blood, it can be given to patients in an emergency so we go through a lot of it,” she said.

“And similarly, O-positive is one of the most common types of blood, 39 per cent of Australians have it, which means we also need a lot of that.”

The Red Cross has joined forces with emergency services to encourage more people to donate.

West Australian paramedic Wesley Ackerman nearly lost his life after he was critically injured in a head-on collision last year.

He said the blood transfusion he received saved his life.

Ms Willet said 8,000 O-type blood donations were needed across the country in order to keep supplies at a safe level.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-05-23/traditional-healers-of-the-npy-lands-guide-the-way/8550786

Navigating the complexities of Western medicine can be a challenging and even frightening experience for Aboriginal people of Central Australia.

Making that journey a little easier are the traditional healers of the NPY lands, the Ngangkari.

For thousands of years before white settlement, their system of healthcare encompassed physical, social and emotional wellbeing, passed down from community elders.

In Central Australia, Ngangkari are supported by the medical community and their contribution to the mental wellbeing of Aboriginal people has been officially recognised.

Alison ‘Tjulapi’ Carol, also a Ngangkari, credited the NPY women’s council with leading the charge for the Ngangkari’s esteemed place in the medical community of Central Australia.

Tjulapi explained that Ngangkari have an invaluable role to play in bridging the divide between traditional and Western models of healthcare.

She said the care provided by Ngangkari was both spiritual and physical.

Angela Lynch, the NPY women’s council’s Ngangkari program manager, said … they were particularly respected for their work in promoting mental health, and at times they were relied upon for assistance.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-05-22/child-contracts-measles-overseas-sparking-victorian-health-alert/8548338

Health authorities have urged passengers on a flight from Indonesia to Melbourne earlier this month to seek urgent medical attention after an unvaccinated child was diagnosed with measles.

The three-year-old was admitted to hospital after arriving at Melbourne Airport on Garuda airlines flight GA 716 from Jakarta at 9:20am on May 13.

Acting Victorian chief health officer Dr Brett Sutton said the child was diagnosed with measles on the weekend.

“We’re concerned that this person could have been infectious while on the flight,” he said.

“Anyone who hasn’t been immunised against measles or has only had one vaccine might potentially be at risk of contracting it.”

Dr Sutton said one in three children with the illness were hospitalised, with the disease usually beginning with common cold symptoms such as a runny nose, red eyes and a cough, followed by a fever and rash.

He said he was not surprised an unvaccinated child contracted measles while overseas.

Liked it? Take a second to support healthprofessionalradio on Patreon!