The Health News USA October 27 2017

  • Premiums will rise an average of 27% for the hundreds of thousands of Michigan residents who buy their own health insurance. he state Department of Insurance and Financial Services published the rates Wednesday. Enrollment for 2018 begins in a week. About 80% of Michigan customers on the federal marketplace qualify for tax credits to offset their premium costs.
  • The issue of waning protection from vaccination is expected to be discussed when the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices meets in Atlanta. The two-day meeting opens Wednesday. The federal panel of experts recommends what vaccines children and adults should receive and when. Flu and mumps vaccine will be included in the panel’s discussion. ith.
  • An alarming study released Wednesday found many baby food products test positive for arsenic, including 80% of infant formulas. After about 530 baby food products were tested, researchers found 65% of products tested positive for arsenic, 36% for lead, 58% for cadmium and 10% for acrylamide. All of these chemicals pose potential dangers to developing infants.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 27th of  October 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

http://www.newsobserver.com/news/business/article180858776.html

Premiums will rise an average of twenty seven percent for the hundreds of thousands of Michigan residents who buy their own health insurance. Consumers eligible for income-based tax credits will be protected from the increasing premiums. The state Department of Insurance and Financial Services published the rates Wednesday. Enrollment for two thousand eighteen begins in a week.

Eight Michigan insurers will participate in a federally facilitated marketplace formed under the U.S. health care law. In each county, there will be at least two insurers selling plans.
The state has said the premiums are higher than expected because President Donald Trump recently ended cost-sharing payments to insurers for providing lower-income people discounts on out-of-pocket costs. About eighty percent of Michigan customers on the federal marketplace qualify for tax credits to offset their premium costs.

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/wireStory/us-vaccine-panel-discuss-waning-effectiveness-shots-50688784

No vaccine is perfect, and it can take many years to find out how well a new vaccine works and how long it lasts. Sometimes, health officials have called for an additional dose when it became clear the first round wasn’t cutting it. But disappointing performance is also prompting drugmakers to pursue new vaccines for older patients, using new additives to boost effectiveness. The issue of waning protection is expected to be discussed when the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices meets in Atlanta. The two-day meeting opens Wednesday. The federal panel of experts recommends what vaccines children and adults should receive and when.

The annual flu vaccine is a particularly hard one to nail. The virus changes quickly and spreads easily. U.S. health officials make their best guess each spring about the formula for the next flu season. In four of the last seven seasons, the flu vaccine didn’t work much at all in people sixty five and older, who can be hit hard by the flu because of weaker immune systems.

There’s a relatively new vaccine for over sixty that includes an immune-boosting additive, but it hasn’t been around long enough to know exactly how well works. The vaccine panel will hear an update about a nasal-spray version of flu vaccine that it stopped recommending after health officials said it wasn’t working in U.S. kids.

Mumps is best known for causing puffy cheeks, but sometimes can lead to hearing loss, meningitis and even loss of sterility. A mumps vaccine has been part of routine childhood shots for nearly five decades. Yet, there were five thousand three hundred cases reported in the U.S. last year — the most in a decade — and so far the numbers this year are not far off. Illnesses in vaccinated people tend to be less severe, health officials say. Still, research suggests that ten or more years after the second childhood dose, protection against the virus fades enough to help outbreaks take hold. The federal panel is not expected to propose a third dose for all kids, but is talking about endorsing an extra shot where an outbreak occurs.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2017/10/25/these-baby-foods-and-formulas-tested-positive-arsenic-lead-and-bpa-new-study/794291001/

An alarming study released Wednesday found many baby food products test positive for arsenic, including eighty percent of infant formulas.The Clean Label Project, a nonprofit advocating for transparent labeling, tested baby food, infant formulas, toddler drinks and snacks purchased within the past five months. The group, which did not publish findings in a peer-reviewed journal, looked at top-selling formulas and baby food using Nielsen data, and also included emerging national brands. After about five hundred thirty baby food products were tested, researchers found sixty five percent of products tested positive for arsenic, thirty six percent for lead, fifty eight for cadmium and ten for acrylamide. All of these chemicals pose potential dangers to developing infants.

Jennifer Lowry, pediatrician and toxicologist at Children’s Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Missouri, who is not affiliated with the research, said these chemicals can affect fine motor skills and cognition.  Mainstream brands including Gerber, Plum Organics and Sprout were among the worst offenders — scoring two out of five in the Clean Label Project’s report card for toxic metals. Arsenic was the most common contaminate spotted in the Clean Label Project study. Nearly eighty percent of infant formula samples tested positive for arsenic. The toxin is associated with developmental defects, cardiovascular disease, neurotoxicity, diabetes and even cancer, according to the World Health Organization.

In two thousand sixteen, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration proposed a limit of one hundred parts per billion of arsenic in infant rice cereal, but isn’t enforcing that limit. Rice often absorbs arsenic from contaminated soil as it grows in the environment.

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