The Health News Australia November 22 2017

  • Patients now have access to an interactive one-stop shop website for cancer information, with data on survival rates, screening and treatment. Cancer Australia CEO Professor Helen Zorbas said the new National Cancer Control Indicators (NCCI) website was a unique, national resource bringing reliable national data together for the first time. The website was designed for policymakers, governments, cancer organisation, researchers and health professionals.
  • Bannister Law is investigating a possible class action against the creators of Banana Boat aerosol sunscreens, after consumers complained of being burned while using the products. It has has launched its investigation today, after it asked skincare product-testing company Eurofins Dermatest to conduct independent tests on seven Banana Boat aerosol sunscreens. The tests showed that the sun protection factor (SPF) for Banana Boat’s SPF 50+ aerosol range fell short of the marketed SPF 50+
  • A Malaysian researcher has raised concern post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may be going undiagnosed in cancer survivors. research suggests that PTSD in cancer patients may be much higher than previously thought. A Malaysian study of nearly 500 patients published in journal CANCER found 22% had partial or full PTSD six months after diagnosis.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 22nd of November 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-11-22/new-interactive-cancer-website-launched/9175334

Patients now have access to an interactive one-stop shop website for cancer information, with data on survival rates, screening and treatment. Cancer Australia CEO Professor Helen Zorbas said the new National Cancer Control Indicators website was a unique, national resource bringing reliable national data together for the first time.

….
The NCCI website was designed for policymakers, governments, cancer organisations, researchers and health professionals. Professor Zorbas said:  “Most importantly, for the broader community and the people affected by cancer, it’s a trustworthy, authoritative source of information.” The website provides data on cancer prevention, screening, diagnosis, treatment and psychological care. It also allows experts to monitor Australian cancer trends and compare them to those in other countries.

Patients can look up what percentage of people took part in bowel cancer screening programs or forty point nine per cent or how many Australians had a diagnosed cancer in a specific year. In two thousand twelve, it was more than four hundred ten thousand five hundred. Website users can find information on all known cancers, and can even filter the data by tumour type and by category, such as population group, gender, age, and socio-economic status. Researchers sourced the information from fifteen reliable data sets from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, the Australian Bureau of Statistics and the federal Department of Health.

….
The site is designed to be updated as new data comes available.

http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/health/health-problems/bannister-law-firm-launches-investigation-into-possible-class-action-against-makers-of-banana-boat/news-story/4dabd2653a2a8518745ccb8b38de5813

The Australian law firm, Bannister Law is investigating a possible class action against the creators of Banana Boat aerosol sunscreens, after consumers complained of being burned while using the products. It has launched its investigation, after it asked skincare product-testing company Eurofins Dermatest to conduct independent tests on seven Banana Boat aerosol sunscreens. The tests showed that the sun protection factor (SPF) for Banana Boat’s SPF fifty plus aerosol range fell short of the marketed SPF fifty plus.

The law firm ordered the tests to be conducted after a mother-of-five came to them, claiming they suffered sunburn after using Banana Boat’s Ultra Clear Sunscreen Spray SPF fifty plus and Kids Clear Sunscreen Spray fifty plus.Charles Bannister, Founder and Principal of Bannister Law, said the results were worrying. He said “Consumers expect sunscreens to meet the advertised SPF. All seven aerosol varieties we tested fell well short of the marketed SPF fifty plus. To claim SPF fifty plus, products need to test greater that 60 plus .”

But the makers of Banana Boat products, Edgewell Personal Care Australia, has disputed the test results.In a statement to News Corp Australia , a spokeswoman said: “We disagree and question the anomalous SPF results provided by Dermatest. These results are entirely inconsistent with the testing we have conducted at Edgewell’s reputable labs in accordance with the Australian mandatory standard as regulated by the Therapeutic Goods Administration. All Banana Boat products meet the SPF claim as labelled on pack.”

The investigation into the class action comes after Banana Boat faced many complaints via social media about their sunscreens earlier this year. Mister Bannister said he believed the test showed consumers were not at fault.

https://healthtimes.com.au/hub/mental-health/37/news/aap/ptsd-may-be-going-undiagnosed-in-cancer-survivors/3032/

A Malaysian researcher has raised concern post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may be going undiagnosed in cancer survivors. Research suggests that PTSD in cancer patients may be much higher than previously thought. A Malaysian study of nearly five hundred patients published in journal CANCER found twenty two per cent had partial or full PTSD six months after diagnosis.One third were still living with PTSD at four years. The study also found that compared with patients with other cancer types, those with breast cancer were three point seven times less likely to develop PTSD at six months but not at four years.

The findings highlight the need for early identification, careful monitoring and treatment of PTSD in cancer survivors, say the researchers. They did however note that the results may not apply to non-Asian populations. Although PTSD is primarily known to develop in individuals following a traumatic event such as a serious accident, natural disaster or war, it can also occur in patients diagnosed with cancer.

Many survivors also live in fear their cancer may come back adding to their psychological stress.
Because of this, survivors might skip visits to their oncologists or other physicians to avoid triggering memories of their past cancer experience.

0 Comments

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.