The Health News Australia August 18 2017

Overview

  • Cairns and Hinterland Hospital and Health Service has decided to re-tender its milk supply contract, following a backlash over its decision to award the deal to a non-local processor. Parmalat Australia was granted the contract in July over Atherton Tablelands processor Lion Dairy. The CEO of the Cairns and Hinterland Hospital and Health Service, Clare Douglas, said it has now decided it would not be proceeding with the new dairy supply agreement and will be returning to their existing suppliers and a new procurement tender process will be conducted within 12 months.
  • Meegan Hefford, 25 years old, had a rare genetic disorder that stopped her breaking down all the protein she was consuming in the form of supplements, shakes and egg whites which caused her death. Meegan did not know about the disorder, and now her family is calling for more restrictions on the diet industry and believe more warnings should be put out in relation to high-protein diets.
  • Dr. Claudia Louch, a London-based dermatologist gives her expert opinion on how beat stress and make your skin look better. She advises examining your diet, exercise more, get enough sleep, among others.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 18th of August 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/rural/2017-08-16/far-north-qld-health-service-milk-supply-contract-backflip/8812806

A Far North Queensland health service has decided to re-tender its milk supply contract, following a backlash over its decision to award the deal to a non-local processor.

Parmalat Australia was granted the contract in July over Atherton Tablelands processor Lion Dairy. It was a decision that meant milk would need to be shipped thousands of kilometres from Brisbane through Rockhampton to the far north, while at the same time Tablelands dairy farmers would have to pay freight to send their excess milk south. The CEO of the Cairns and Hinterland Hospital and Health Service, Clare Douglas, said it has now decided it would not be proceeding with the new dairy supply agreement. Miss Douglas said that the Health Service will be returning to their existing suppliers and a new procurement tender process will be conducted within twelve months.

The KAP member for Dalrymple, Shane Knuth, who lobbied the Queensland Health Minister Cameron Dick on behalf of Tablelands dairy farmers, said he was confident Lion Dairy would be awarded the contract once the State Government’s buy local procurement policy comes into effect in September.

A spokesman for Health Minister Cameron Dick said he was unable to comment on contractual matters. But Queensland Dairy Farmers director, James Geraghty, who is also a Tablelands dairy farmer, welcomed the news and said Parmalat should not have been awarded the deal in the first place. He said that it’s just a reversal of an unnecessary stress on local farmers and how it ever happened is beyond me. “However, if this contract has only been reversed because of public pressure it’s the wrong way to go.

http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/health/health-problems/meegan-hefford-died-from-rare-genetic-disorder-and-protein-diet/news-story/c8616392372d609d9646197feacced1b

A West Australian woman was killed by a strict diet of protein supplements, shakes and egg whites. Meegan Hefford was found unconscious in her apartment in Mandurah in June by a real estate agent conducting a property inspection. She was rushed to hospital because she was rapidly losing brain function. It has now been revealed she had a genetic disorder that stopped her breaking down the protein she was consuming. PerthNow reports urea cycle disorder, which affects one in eight thousand people, caused a build-up of ammonia in her blood and fluid in her brain. The twenty five-year-old did not know about the disorder, and now her family is calling for more restrictions on the diet industry and believe more warnings should be put out in relation to high-protein diets.

According to PerthNow, Miss Hefford’s death certificate said an intake of bodybuilding supplements was one of the causes of death. Her mother, Michelle White, said Miss Hefford had ramped up her gym activity and began a strict diet earlier this year for a bodybuilding competition to be held next month. She was going to the gym twice a day and eating a lot of protein as well as taking supplements. Miss White said she hoped her daughter’s death would encourage the supplements industry to enforce stricter regulations.She found a number of protein supplement containers in her daughter’s kitchen as well as a detailed diet plan.Health experts said taking supplements was risky, even for people who did not have a medical condition. Australian Medical Association Western Australia president Doctor Omar Khorshid told PerthNow people should stick to a balanced diet.

http://www.theage.com.au/lifestyle/health-and-wellbeing/wellbeing/what-is-your-stressed-skin-trying-to-tell-you-20170619-gwuh2m.html

Stress can cause DNA damage, leaving cells less able to repair themselves, leading to signs of accelerated ageing. Stress can also lead to skin irritation as the body creates more histamines.

Doctor Claudia Louch, a London-based dermatologist internationally famed for her natural approach, says she has noticed a dramatic increase in middle-aged women experiencing acne for the first time since their teenage years. Typically, they have perioral acne, which appears around the mouth and chin.”I see it more because as women we face much more challenging roles than ever before,” she explains. “We’re expected to be mothers, have a career, a family. Jobs are demanding and there is stress about how we look.

Women hammer away in the gym on top of it and that’s another physical stress.”She believes that while stress can have a negative impact on the skin, it is often also linked to underlying causes – like hormonal imbalances, yeast infections or poor nutrition. Her clinic tackles skin problems by investigating what is going on inside the body, via a full hormonal check, blood screen and hi-tech equipment looking at the skin. Clients are then often prescribed supplements, given full dietary plans and advised to use certain natural products to restore hydration to the skin.

Here are some tips to beat stress and make your skin look better: Examine your diet. Cut down on foods with sugar. Have a diet high in antioxidants with foods such as avocados. Exercise more and get enough sleep. If you have oily skin, cut down on dairy.

 

0 Comments

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.