The Health News United Kingdom July 25 2017

Overview

  • According to a survey, most women do not know how much they should be eating while pregnant. The National Charity Partnership found only a third of the expectant mothers questioned got the correct answer.
  • The parents of critically ill baby Charlie Gard have dropped their legal bid to send him to the United States for an experimental treatment after new medical tests showed that the window of opportunity to help him had closed.
  • Blood donation rules for sex workers and gay men are being relaxed in England and Scotland after improvements in the accuracy of testing procedures. Men who have sex with men can now give blood 3 months after their last sexual activity instead of 12. And sex workers, who were previously barred from donating, now can, subject to the same 3-month rule.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 25th of July 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-40698876

Most women do not know how much they should be eating while pregnant, a survey has suggested. The National Charity Partnership found only a third of the expectant mothers questioned got the correct answer. Health watchdog NICE advises that in the first six months of pregnancy women do not need any extra calories. But in the last trimester they require two hundred extra calories a day – equivalent to two pieces of wholegrain toast with olive oil spread.

The National Charity Partnership, made up of Diabetes UK, the British Heart Foundation and Tesco, says information on what pregnant women can eat is not reaching them.

Its research of two thousand one hundred UK women suggests more than one in three expectant mothers think they have to eat three hundred or more extra calories every day.

Meanwhile, sixty one percent of the one hundred forty women who were pregnant when questioned believed they should start taking on extra calories in the first or second trimester.

The NCP is working with the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists to debunk the myth of “eating for two” and make dietary requirements for pregnant women easier to understand. Eating for two is the idea that women need to eat for both them and their unborn child when they are pregnant.

A woman normally needs to have two thousand calories calories a day – this includes food and drink. But when you are in the last trimester of your pregnancy, you should eat two hundred extra calories a day. There is no need for any additional calories in the first six months.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-07-24/charlie-gard-parents-end-legal-battle-over-treatment/8739588

The parents of critically ill baby Charlie Gard have dropped their legal bid to send him to the United States for an experimental treatment after new medical tests showed that the window of opportunity to help him had closed. Chris Gard and Connie Yates wept as they withdrew their appeal during a London High Court hearing, signalling the end of a legal saga that had stretched for months. The couple’s attorney, Grant Armstrong, said recent medical tests on eleven -month-old Charlie showed the baby had irreversible muscular damage, and the new treatment would not help.

Mister Armstrong said for Charlie, it is too late. The damage has been done. Charlie has waited patiently for treatment. Due to delay, that window of opportunity has been lost. Mister Armstrong said the news had left Charlie’s parents extremely distressed and they now “wish to spend the maximum amount of time they have left with Charlie”. Charlie has a rare genetic condition causing progressive muscle weakness and brain damage. His parents had sought to send him to the United States to undergo experimental therapy.

Britain’s courts, backed by the European Court of Human Rights, refused permission, saying it would prolong his suffering without any realistic prospect of helping the 11-month-old child.

The case won international attention after Charlie’s parents received support from Pope Francis and US President Donald Trump.

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-40669950

Blood donation rules for sex workers and gay men are being relaxed in England and Scotland after improvements in the accuracy of testing procedures. Men who have sex with men can now give blood three months after their last sexual activity instead of twelve. And sex workers, who were previously barred from donating, now can, subject to the same three-month rule.

Experts said the move would give more people the opportunity to donate blood without affecting blood supply safety. The Advisory Committee on the Safety of Blood, Tissues and Organs – which advises UK health departments – recommended the changes after concluding that new testing systems were accurate and donors were good at complying with the rules.All blood that is donated in the UK undergoes a mandatory test for Hepatitis B and C, and HIV, plus a couple of other viruses.

Scientists agree that three months is a comfortably long window for a virus or infection to appear and be picked up in the blood.Professor James Neuberger, from the committee, said: “Technologies to pick up the presence of the virus have greatly improved, so we can now pick up viruses at a much earlier stage in the infection, and therefore it’s much easier to tell if a blood donor has the virus.”

The rule changes will come into force at blood donation centres in Scotland in November, and in early two thousand and eighteen in England.The changes affect groups including: men who have sex with other men, people who have sex with high-risk partners – for example, those who have been in areas where HIV is common and commercial sex workers.

They will now all be able to donate blood after abstaining from sex for three months.

The UK government is also considering relaxing the rules for people who have undergone acupuncture, piercing, tattooing and endoscopies, and for those with a history of non-prescribed injecting drug use. But these also need changes to current EU legislation.

 

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