The Health News United Kingdom November 14 2017

  • A new report suggests that people should be given advice on healthy eating or alcohol consumption during trips to the dentist.  Dentists are “perfectly placed” to deliver health promotion and prevention advice to their patients, according to new report from the Nuffield Trust and the Health Foundation. The new report on the state of NHS dentistry in England suggests that health officials have “missed” an opportunity to include dentists in wider ill-health prevention plans.
  • According to a recent NHS Digital survey, Your child is much less likely to have smoked a cigarette than a 1990s youngster. The survey contacted 12,051 students aged 11 to 15 from across the UK to learn how many had ever tasted alcohol, smoked a cigarette or tried drugs. Girls were more likely than boys to have smoked a cigarette and to have been drunk in the past four weeks.
  • Diabetes symptoms could be spotted earlier with a new, non-invasive blood glucose level checker that doesn’t require any “painful and annoying” finger pricking. Diabetes patients could check their blood glucose levels without a finger prick. The device from   DiaMonTech checks the amount of glucose in diabetes patients’ bloodstream by measure their temperature.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 14th of November 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/dentists-perfectly-placed-to-give-healthy-living-advice-report_uk_59fadd26e4b0415a42098cc6?utm_hp_ref=uk-health-news

A new report suggests that people should be given advice on healthy eating or alcohol consumption during trips to the dentist.  Dentists are “perfectly placed” to deliver health promotion and prevention advice to their patients, according to new report from the Nuffield Trust and the Health Foundation. They could deliver advice on healthy eating, alcohol consumption and giving up smoking, it states. The new report on the state of NHS dentistry in England suggests that health officials have “missed” an opportunity to include dentists in wider ill-health prevention plans. Including dentists in these plans could see improvements in the nation’s dental health as well as driving down cases of obesity and diabetes, they added.

Meanwhile the analysis found drastic differences between the north and south of England when it comes to good dental health. There is also a big divide between the rich and the poor.
The authors said that while significant improvements have been made in the nation’s dental health, this progress risks stalling unless action is taken to drive down inequalities. People from the most deprived backgrounds were twice as likely (fourteen percent) to be admitted to hospital for dental work than those that were better off (seven percent) in two thousand fifteen. Eighteen percent of parents with children eligible for free school meals found it difficult to find an NHS dentist in two thousand thirteen, compared with eleven percent of parents whose children were not.

But the authors also celebrated some improvements including the proportion of adults without any teeth reaching an all-time low.And the proportion of young children with tooth decay is on the decline. Report author and Nuffield Trust director of research, Professor John Appleby, said: “As a nation our dental health is improving, but it is shocking that your income or where you live can still determine your dental health, how likely you are to be hospitalised with dental problems and how easily you can access the dental treatment you need.”

The report makes a number of recommendations including improving access to dentists among the most deprived and supporting research to better understand the impact of dental health interventions. A Department of Health spokeswoman said: “Improving oral health, particularly in children, is a key priority for this Government and we want everyone to be able to access an NHS dentist wherever they are.

http://www.cambridge-news.co.uk/news/health/how-likely-your-child-drink-13886780

According to a recent NHS Digital survey, your child is much less likely to have smoked a cigarette than a nineteen nineties youngster. The survey contacted twelve thousand fifty one students aged eleven to fifteen from across the UK to learn how many had ever tasted alcohol, smoked a cigarette or tried drugs.

Girls were more likely than boys to have smoked a cigarette and to have been drunk in the past four weeks. The number of youngsters who had ever smoked dropped significantly from nineteen ninety six to two thousand sixteen. Almost one in five had smoked a cigarette in two thousand sixteen, which is similar to the survey results in two thousand fourteen. Results were much higher in nineteen ninety six at forty nine per cent. Three per cent of pupils were regular smokers, which meant at least one cigarette a week.

Twenty per cent of regular smokers were committed to giving up and said they had tried in the past and would still like to end the habit. More than twice as many, forty four per cent, were not worried about becoming dependent on cigarettes and had no interest in quitting.

http://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/877525/diabetes-symptoms-glucose-device-blood

Diabetes symptoms could be spotted earlier with a new, non-invasive blood glucose level checker that doesn’t require any “painful and annoying” finger pricking. Diabetes patients could check their blood glucose levels without a finger prick. The device checks the amount of glucose in diabetes patients’ bloodstream by measuring their temperature.

Patients simply places their fingertips on a sensor, wait for about ten seconds, and the device analyses the amount of glucose in their blood. The warmer the fingertip, the more glucose, the manufacturer, DiaMonTech, said. It uses infrared technology, and is about the size of a shoebox. But, the device will be made into pocket and wristband sizes soon.

According to the company’s CEO Thorsten Lubinski: “Pricking your fingers can be painful and annoying, and it raises the risk of infection.”  Diabetes patients could benefit from the shoebox-sized device as early as next year. It has already received clearance for sale as a medical device. It will then be made smaller to easily fit into patients’ pockets – similar to the size of a muffin. The pocket device – which should be available to buy in two thousand nineteen – will send readings directly to the patient’s smartphone, to track blood glucose levels live.

Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are three point five million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated five hundred thousand who are living undiagnosed with the condition. There are about four point five million diabetes sufferers in the UK, including one point one million undiagnosed patients. One person every two minutes is diagnosed with the condition in the UK.

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