The Health News United Kingdom December 14 2017

  • UK experts say “heat-not-burn” tobacco products are harmful to health even though they are safer than regular cigarettes. The advisory panel to the government said the devices produce “a number of compounds of concern”, including some that can cause cancer. Manufacturers say their products are aimed at smokers who want the “taste of tobacco with no smoke and less smell”. The panel was concerned that young non-smokers might start using the products. There were also worries that the products could lead people to take up smoking cigarettes.
  • Men with the deadliest form of prostate cancer are being offered surgery on the NHS for the first time in a trial aiming to save lives. London surgeons are leading the UK’s participation in an international project that is investigating whether removing the prostate can slow or even stop the spread of cancer in the bones. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men and is the 2nd most deadly after lung cancer — causing 11,300 male deaths a year in Britain.
  • Bowel Cancer UK has warned that almost 332,000 people living in the UK will needlessly lose their lives to bowel cancer by 2035 unless urgent action is taken to fill critical research gaps. Bowel cancer is the UK’s 2nd biggest cancer killer with 16,000 people dying from the disease each year. It’s also the 4th most common cancer with over 41,200 diagnosed annually.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 14th of December 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-42328236

UK experts say “heat-not-burn” tobacco products are harmful to health even though they are safer than regular cigarettes. The advisory panel to the government said the devices produce “a number of compounds of concern”, including some that can cause cancer. Manufacturers say their products are aimed at smokers who want the “taste of tobacco with no smoke and less smell”. The panel was concerned that young non-smokers might start using the products. There were also worries that the products could lead people to take up smoking cigarettes.
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The Committee on Toxicity (Cot) looked at the available evidence about the risks of two heat-not-burn products that have recently gone on sale in the UK – IQOS and iFuse.
The devices heat tobacco to a high enough temperature to create a vapour but not smoke.
They are different to e-cigarettes, which vaporise a liquid containing nicotine – the highly addictive compound in tobacco smoke. The committee found that people using heat-not-burn products are exposed to between fifty percent to ninety percent fewer “harmful and potentially harmful” compounds compared with conventional cigarettes.

Professor Alan Boobis, committee chairman, said: “The evidence suggests that heat-not-burn products still pose a risk to users. There is likely to be a reduction in risk for cigarette smokers who switch to heat-not-burn products but quitting entirely would be more beneficial.”
There was not enough evidence for the committee to compare heat-not-burn with e-cigarettes.
But the committee noted: “If people perceive e-cigarettes as safe this perception could transfer to heat-not-burn tobacco products, despite a lack of data on which to establish this.”
Public Health England says there is a large amount of evidence that shows e-cigarettes are much less harmful than smoking – at least ninety five percent. Health experts say quitting tobacco-use completely is still the healthiest option.  A spokesman for Philip Morris Limited, which makes IQOS, said: “We are encouraged by today’s statement of the UK’s Committee on Toxicity and will continue to share our scientific evidence.

https://www.standard.co.uk/news/health/prostate-cancer-patients-to-be-offered-lifesaving-operations-on-nhs-for-the-first-time-a3715866.html

Men with the deadliest form of prostate cancer are being offered surgery on the NHS for the first time in a trial aiming to save lives. London surgeons are leading the UK’s participation in an international project that is investigating whether removing the prostate can slow or even stop the spread of cancer in the bones.

Under NHS rules, men whose cancer is found to have spread are not offered surgery as the disease is deemed too advanced. Instead they receive hormone treatment followed by chemotherapy and possibly immunotherapy. Survival does not usually extend beyond five years.
Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men and is the second most deadly after lung cancer — causing eleven thousand three hundred male deaths a year in Britain.
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A total of twenty one men have taken part in the trial to date — seventeen at University College London Hospital in Westmoreland Street, three in the Royal Surrey County Hospital in Guildford and one in Oxford.

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Early indications are positive, with PSA tests on the first patients indicating the extent of their cancer has fallen after surgery. The aim is to prove that removing the prostate can improve survival rates by thirty percent.

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/over-300000-people-will-needlessly-die-from-bowel-cancer-by-2035-because-of-research-gaps-charity-warns_uk_5a2e72fce4b069ec48aece15?utm_hp_ref=uk-health-news

A leading charity has warned that almost three hundred thirty two thousand people living in the UK will needlessly lose their lives to bowel cancer by two thousand thirty five unless urgent action is taken to fill critical research gaps.  Bowel cancer is the UK’s second biggest cancer killer with sixteen thousand people dying from the disease each year. It’s also the fourth most common cancer with over forty one thousand two hundred diagnosed annually.

Bowel Cancer UK worked with one hundred leading scientists, healthcare professionals and people affected by the disease to identify the key research gaps and priorities in bowel cancer research that need to be tackled to save lives. The charity is now calling on the general public to help fundraise and raise awareness.  Early diagnosis is vital for reducing the high death rates surrounding the disease, however it can be difficult to detect as symptoms are often attributed to more common, but less serious, conditions.
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Nearly ninety eight percent of people will survive bowel cancer for five years or more if detected at stage one compared with less than one in ten people who are diagnosed at stage four.
Bowel Cancer UK has published a new report, ‘Finding the key to the cures: a plan to end bowel cancer by two thousand fifty’, which sets out fifteen questions with vital recommendations to address gaps in research.  Deborah Alsina, chief executive of the charity, said: “The harsh reality is that every year sixteen thousand people lose their lives to the disease, and if left unchecked, this number will only increase in the future. The need for speed prompted us to take action to identify a plan to accelerate bowel cancer research.

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