The Health News Australia March 10 2018

  • Breastfeeding can be as varied as the women and babies doing it. Olivia Brown’s experience breastfeeding her second child changed her career and her life. The pressure took a toll on Miss Brown’s health. Miss Brown states:  “I was so exhausted when my little one was six weeks old, I actually went one hundred percent blind in one eye.” Ms. Brown’s sight did return then she travelled Tasmania photographing women breastfeeding their children and collecting their stories to put together in a book.
  • According to new analysis, fast food sold in Australia is just as unhealthy as it ever was, despite the introduction of mandatory menu labelling.  A study by Cancer Council NSW and the George Institute for Global Health found the kilojoule content of foods sold at the top five food chains – Hungry Jack’s, KFC, McDonald’s, Oporto and Red Rooster – has not changed since 2009. Menu labelling was introduced in NSW in 2012 and has been adopted in 4 other states and territories in response to rising obesity rates.
  • The level of hospital care received by a Devonport man who died after suffering a stroke six years ago has been described as indifferent and farcical by the Tasmanian coroner. Father-of-two Darryl Morris died in September 2012, 6 days after presenting at the North West Regional Hospital by ambulance. The 41-year-old had previously “enjoyed good health”, Coroner Rod Chandler found, but was found unconscious by his wife on the family’s front lawn. By the time the ambulance arrived, he was conscious but was unable to walk and had lost feeling in his left side. Mr. Chandler described Mister Morris’ diagnosis encephalitis as “a serious misjudgement” and found that “once the MRI was ordered it should have been obtained as a matter of urgency”.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 10th of March 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-03-09/breastfeeding-experiences-told-in-photo-exhibition/9523540

Breastfeeding can be as varied as the women and babies doing it. Olivia Brown’s experience breastfeeding her second child changed her career and her life. She told Ryk Goddard on ABC Radio Hobart:  “I had a baby that wouldn’t take a bottle and that affected a lot of things, like returning to work. “I did try to go back to work, but he was one hundred percent dependent on me.” The pressure took a toll on Miss Brown’s health. Miss Brown states:  “I was so exhausted when my little one was six weeks old, I actually went one hundred percent blind in one eye.”
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Miss Brown’s sight did return and she decided to quit her job and focus her time working as a photographer in her own business instead. Alongside her paying jobs of wedding and engagement photography, she decided to work on a personal project to show and tell the stories of women’s experiences feeding their babies.
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Miss Brown travelled Tasmania photographing women breastfeeding their children and collecting their stories to put together in a book. She asked the women to give one word describing how they felt about breastfeeding. She said:  “Ninety percent of them had a different word. I found that really fascinating.” “Words like ‘powerful’, ‘connected’, ‘amazing’, ‘loyal’, ‘blessed’, ‘equipped’, ‘joyous’. ‘Anxious’ might have been one, but most of them were really positive.”

Miss Brown is showing all one hundred photographs in an exhibition this month to highlight how no-one’s experience is wrong or right — it all comes down to doing what you can for you and the baby.
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The exhibition, Where Is My Village? Breastfeeding Portraits, opens at the Long Gallery in Salamanca on Friday and runs until March twenty.

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2018/mar/09/fast-food-menu-labelling-hasnt-made-choices-healthier-study-shows

According to new analysis, fast food sold in Australia is just as unhealthy as it ever was, despite the introduction of mandatory menu labelling.  A study by Cancer Council New South Wales and the George Institute for Global Health found the kilojoule content of foods sold at the top five food chains – Hungry Jack’s, KFC, McDonald’s, Oporto and Red Rooster – has not changed since two thousand nine.

Researchers tracked the kilojoule content per serving and per one hundred grams of menu items sold at the chains in March and April every year for seven years, from two thousand nine to two thousand fifteen.
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Menu labelling was introduced in New South Wales in two thousand twelve and has been adopted in four other states and territories in response to rising obesity rates. It means that any fast-food restaurant with twenty or more stores across the state or fifty or more nationally has to show kilojoule information on menus and displays. Yet evidence shows labelling helps customers make healthier choices. A Cochrane Library review of menu labelling in restaurants and coffee shops found it reduced calorie consumption by about eight percent to twelve percent a meal.

Despite this and in light of the Cancer Council research, public health experts want the government to work with the fast food industry to reformulate the high-sugar and high-fat food they produce.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-03-09/darryl-morris-stroke-death-coroner-findings/9530572

 

The level of hospital care received by a Devonport man who died after suffering a stroke six years ago has been described as indifferent and farcical by the Tasmanian coroner. Father-of-two Darryl Morris died in September two thousand twelve, six days after presenting at the North West Regional Hospital by ambulance.

The forty one-year-old had previously “enjoyed good health”, Coroner Rod Chandler found, but was found unconscious by his wife on the family’s front lawn. By the time the ambulance arrived, he was conscious but was unable to walk and had lost feeling in his left side.

Based on a large number of reports and affidavits submitted by hospital staff, the coroner determined Mister Morris was wrongly diagnosed with encephalitis, a condition spread by animals or insects. A critical MRI scan at the Launceston General Hospital was delayed on the Friday, the attending specialist submitted, because staff did not think the case was urgent and it could be held over until Monday.

When the scan was finally conducted, it recorded “significant abnormalities,” but the results were not properly communicated, Mister Chandler discovered, because hospital staff did not know how to use an internal computer system. Instead of the case being escalated, Mister  Morris was returned to the North West Regional Hospital. As his condition deteriorated further, he was eventually transferred to the Royal Hobart Hospital, but it was too late.
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Mister Chandler described Mister Morris’ diagnosis encephalitis as “a serious misjudgement” and found that “once the MRI was ordered it should have been obtained as a matter of urgency”.

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