The Health News USA September 14 2017

Overview

  • When Hurricane Irma made its way up Florida’s west coast, rescue workers watched helplessly as the nine one one calls piled up on a computer screen. They weren’t allowed to respond. Winds were so high that emergency services in many areas were suspended to protect the rescuers.
  • Dating back at least to the 1980’s, experts have debated the safety of metal “amalgam” cavity fillings, which contain a mixture of metals like silver, copper, nickel and—most alarmingly—mercury.
  • Federal health officials have stated that puppies carrying a common germ called campylobacter have infected 39 people and put 9 of them into the hospital. Most people with Campylobacter get better on their own but severe cases may be treated with antibiotics such as azithromycin or ciprofloxacin.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 14th of  September 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

http://edition.cnn.com/2017/09/11/health/first-responders-frustrated-during-irma/index.html

When the winds kicked up as Hurricane Irma made its way up Florida’s west coast, rescue workers watched helplessly as the nine one one calls piled up on a computer screen.
They weren’t allowed to respond. Winds were so high that emergency services in many areas were suspended to protect the rescuers. Billy Johnston, a firefighter paramedic with Saint Petersburg Fire Rescue said: “It just stinks. You’re sitting here not be able to do your job.’’ He added that “it’s a helpless feeling, but we have to look out for our safety.’’

Pinellas County, which includes Saint Petersburg, suspended its response to nine one one calls at around eight thirty Sunday night, when sustained winds exceeded forty miles per hour, according to Kevin Baxter, a spokesman for the county. Conditions varied, and some fire departments in the northern part of the county did respond to some emergency calls Sunday night, he added. While the workers were prohibited from responding to calls, they were able to see a list of the incoming calls on their computer screen. As the storm raged Sunday night, the Saint Petersburg first responders slept in shifts. Those who were awake reviewed protocols, watched the Seahawks-Packers football game, and played cards and dominoes. Occasionally they ventured out onto a balcony with a roof to experience the wind and rain firsthand.

http://www.foxnews.com/health/2017/09/11/your-old-dental-fillings-probably-contain-mercury-are-dangerous.html

Dating back at least to the nineteen eighties, experts have debated the safety of metal “amalgam” cavity fillings, which contain a mixture of metals like silver, copper, nickel and—most alarmingly—mercury. The American Dental Association or ADA has long taken the position that mercury in these amalgam fillings is safe. Other national health organizations, including the US Food and Drug Adminstration, support this stance. While the FDA acknowledges that mercury “vapor” may leak from amalgam fillings—leading to elevated levels of mercury in the body—it says there’s not good evidence that this mercury leads to negative health outcomes. Even for nursing mothers, the FDA states, “Infants are not at risk for adverse health effects from the mercury in breast milk of women exposed to mercury vapor from dental amalgam.”

“Looking at the existing body of evidence, studies don’t support the belief that there would be negative health effects,” says Doctor Stefanie Russell, a clinical associate professor of epidemiology and health promotion at New York University. Earlier this year, Russell authored a report in the Journal of Evidence-Based Dental Practice. In her report, she examined a recent study of pregnant women and blood mercury. While that study linked having four or more amalgam fillings with elevated mercury levels, it did not find any associated health risks among the women or their kids. It’s important to point out that Russell, the FDA, and the ADA aren’t claiming that amalgam fillings cannot raise your body or blood’s mercury levels. Instead, they’re saying there’s no evidence that the uptick in blood mercury from amalgam fillings is dangerous to your health.

https://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/infected-puppies-put-9-hospital-sicken-30-more-n800406

Federal health officials have stated that puppies carrying a common germ have infected thirty nine people and put nine of them into the hospital. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said that the cases are all linked to puppies sold in seven states by the pet store chain Petland. The infection, called Campylobacter, is common in dogs and it can pass to people easily. The CDC says Campylobacter is one of the most common causes of diarrheal illness in the United States, infecting one point three million people every year. Dogs infected with Campylobacter might look perfectly well, but they can also have diarrhea, vomiting, or a fever.

In people, symptoms include diarrhea, sometimes bloody; fever; stomach cramps; nausea and vomiting. Pregnant women, people over 65 and young children are most susceptible. “Wash your hands thoroughly after touching dogs, their poop, or their food. Take extra care that children playing with the puppies also wash their hands carefully,” the CDC advised. Also dog poop must be picked up and disposed of, especially in areas where children might play. Most people with Campylobacter get better on their own but severe cases may be treated with antibiotics such as azithromycin or ciprofloxacin.

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