The Health News United Kingdom November 23 2017

  • Cancer tests will be offered in supermarket car parks as part of a national drive to boost early diagnosis rates. NHS England will announce potential lung cancer patients in some regions of the country will be invited to community mobile screening units in a bid to catch their cancer early. A pilot that took place in Manchester saw potential cancer patients invited for a lung health check. People with a history of smoking aged 55 to 74 were invited for CT scans at mobile units – which were placed in shopping centre car parks or community hubs.
  • Research reveals that young people are taking part in a wider range of sexual practices, including anal sex, with opposite sex partners. Experts looked at responses to a national sex survey that has been carried out every 10  years since 1990 in the UK. More than one in ten millennial teenagers said they had tried anal sex by the age of 18. By the age of 22 to 24, 3 in every 10 said they had tried it.
  • The head of the NHS has sad that early cancer diagnosis makes a “staggering” difference to survival rates, with patients 18 times more likely to live when the disease is caught sooner. Simon Stevens said improving speed of cancer diagnosis is now the biggest challenge facing the service, as he outlined plans to boost survival rates. Mr. Stevens said earlier diagnosis would save money as well as lives, reducing reliance on the most expensive treatments.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 23rd of November 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

https://www.standard.co.uk/news/health/cancer-tests-in-supermarket-car-parks-in-bid-to-boost-early-diagnosis-rates-a3697571.html

Cancer tests will be offered in supermarket car parks as part of a national drive to boost early diagnosis rates. NHS England will announce potential lung cancer patients in some regions of the country will be invited to community mobile screening units in a bid to catch their cancer early. A pilot that took place in Manchester saw potential cancer patients invited for a lung health check. People with a history of smoking aged fifty five to seventy four were invited for CT scans at mobile units – which were placed in shopping centre car parks or community hubs.
During the pilot, for every thirty three people screened, one case of cancer was detected. The pilot, funded by Macmillan Cancer Support, was carried out on two thousand five people with a history of smoking. During the trial, four in five of the cancers discovered were at stage one or stage two – or earlier in the disease progression.

Now NHS England chief executive Simon Stevens has announced plans to roll out the scheme in four areas across the country. The Manchester project will be extended and three other cancer hubs will also get the green light to provide similar screening services including ones in London, the North and part of Yorkshire. Speaking at the Economist War On Cancer event in London, Mister Stevens says: “NHS cancer care is the best it’s ever been, with cancer survival increasing every year.
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Dany Bell, specialist adviser for treatment and recovery at Macmillan Cancer Support, said: “The earlier that someone is diagnosed with cancer, the better their chance of successful treatment is.

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The report, from the Royal College of Physicians, shows there were five thousand nine hundred thirty six lung cancer removal operations in English hospitals during the two thousand fifteen calendar year – an increase from five thousand six hundred fifty seven operations in two thousand fourteen. The RCP said this was a “record number of lung cancer operations” which means that the average lung cancer surgeon is now performing forty nine operations each year.

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-42051827

Research reveals that young people are taking part in a wider range of sexual practices, including anal sex, with opposite sex partners. Experts looked at responses to a national sex survey that has been carried out every ten years since  nineteen ninety in the UK. More than one in ten millennial teenagers said they had tried anal sex by the age of eighteen. By the age of twenty two to twenty four, three in every ten said they had tried it. Vaginal and oral sex are still the most common types of sexual activity between young men and women, however.
The age that young people start having sex – vaginal, anal or oral – has not changed much in recent decades. In the most recent survey, it was sixteen.
While the study in the Journal of Adolescent Health shows what types of sex people are having, it doesn’t shed light on why preferences are changing. Experts can only speculate, but say society has become more accepting and less judgemental about sexual experimentation.
Kaye Wellings, senior author and professor of sexual and reproductive health at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, said: “The changes in practices we see here are consistent with the widening of other aspects of young people’s sexual experience, and are perhaps not surprising given the rapidly changing social context and the ever-increasing number of influences on sexual behaviour.” She said the internet and media might have played a role in breaking down sexual taboos.

She said more studies were needed to inform sex education and equip young people with the information they need for their sexual health.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/11/21/cancer-patients-18-times-likely-survive-early-diagnosis/

The head of the NHS has sad that early cancer diagnosis makes a “staggering” difference to survival rates, with patients eighteen times more likely to live when the disease is caught sooner.  Simon Stevens said improving speed of cancer diagnosis is now the biggest challenge facing the service, as he outlined plans to boost survival rates. Mister Stevens said earlier diagnosis would save money as well as lives, reducing reliance on the most expensive treatments. Speaking at the War on Cancer conference in London, Mr Stevens said some of the differences in survival depending on stage of diagnosis were “remarkable”.

Mister Stevens highlighted “staggering” differences in survival in bowel cancer, depending on how early it was spotted. Nine in ten of those diagnosed at stage one or two of the disease would still be alive five years later, official figures show. But nineteen in twenty of cases identified at a later stage would not survive, he warned. And Mister Stevens said the NHS would test schemes which allow general practitioners to refer patients for immediate scans for other types of suspected cancer instead of insisting they see a consultant. He also detailed plans for a wider expansion of mobile testing schemes, including CT scanners in car parks to detect lung cancer and improved home testing kits for bowel disease. A pilot scheme in Manchester which placed mobile CT scanners in shopping centre car parks settings quadrupled the number of cases of lung cancer detected at stage one or two, when it is more likely to be curable. In total, eighty per cent of cases were found at these stages. The NHS normally detects just twenty per cent of cases this early.

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