The Health News Australia December 7 2017

  • 42 babies are stillborn in Australia every week, and sixty percent of them are recorded as “unexplained”. Mater Research Institute-University of Queensland researchers undertook a global review of stillbirth reporting and classification, seeking ways to improve procedures. Australia has the fifthtenth lowest rate in the world, with 2.7 stillbirths for every 1,000 births.  Australia ranked poorly in reducing its stillbirth rate over the past 15 years.
  • Nearly half of us will experience a mental illness at some point in our lives. And all of us will go through periods of stress, sadness, grief and conflict. There are a range of people who can help with mental health issues. Some are trained to offer support for psychological issues, like grief and stress, others specialise in more serious mental illnesses such as depression, bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. The three choices are GPs, psychologist and psychiatrists.  
  • Cholesterol-fighting drugs continue to be the most used medicines in Australia, with 2 common statins dispensed more than 20 million times in 12 months. But the prescription drugs causing the biggest dent in the Federal Government’s expenses are those treating the liver viral infection hepatitis C — costing more than $ 2.3 billion in the past financial year.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 7th of December 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://health.uq.edu.au/article/2017/12/stillbirth-not-just-stillbirth-more-information-needed

Forty two babies are stillborn in Australia every week, and sixty percent of them are recorded as “unexplained”. Mater Research Institute-University of Queensland researchers undertook a global review of stillbirth reporting and classification, seeking ways to improve procedures.
Doctor Hanna Reinebrant from UQ’s Centre of Research Excellence in Stillbirth said the study found stillbirths were most commonly categorised as “unexplained”, “other” and “haemorrhage”.
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She said the Australian Government should establish national guidelines for investigating stillbirths. She added: “It’s important to establish a cause of death to help parents understand what went wrong and to guide clinical care for any future pregnancies.”

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Researchers reviewed eighty five reports on stillbirths across fifty countries and found wide variations in investigation and classification systems, with only thirteen considered good quality.
Stillbirths were defined as the loss of a baby at twenty eight weeks’ gestation or more.
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The World Health Organisation has set a global target of twelve stillbirths or fewer per one thousand births by two thousand thirty, but Doctor Reinebrant said even high-income countries needed to reduce their stillbirth rates. Australia has the fifthtenth lowest rate in the world, with two point seven stillbirths for every one thousand births, behind countries like Iceland (one point three), Finland (one point eight), Japan (two point one) and New Zealand (two point three). Australia ranked poorly in reducing its stillbirth rate over the past fifteen years.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/health/2017-12-04/choosing-a-mental-health-professional/9189026

Nearly half of us will experience a mental illness at some point in our lives. And all of us will go through periods of stress, sadness, grief and conflict. There are a range of people who can help with mental health issues. But it can be hard to know who is best to turn to, as practitioners vary widely in their training, experience, and expertise. Some are trained to offer support for psychological issues, like grief and stress, others specialise in more serious mental illnesses such as depression, bipolar disorder or schizophrenia.

Your general practitioner:  If you’re feeling stressed, anxious, depressed, or having difficulty coping, your GP can be a good first port of call. Figures suggest Australians see their GPs for mental health issues more than any other health concern.
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All GPs have mental health training, and for most of us they are the health professional we know best and the one we see most often. If you know you’re going to see your GP about a mental health issue, it can help to plan ahead and book a double appointment. It will give you a bit more time to talk about what’s going on, and what might be the best treatment options for you.

Psychiatrists:  They are medical doctors who specialise in diagnosing and treating mental illness. They tend to treat complex and serious mental illness, and have a deep understanding of physical and mental health, and how they affect each other. Doctor Gordon Parker, professor of psychiatry at the University of New South Wales and founder of the Black Dog Institute said
“Psychiatrists have a broad knowledge of biological factors as well as psychological and psychiatric issues.”  Psychiatrists typically work with people with conditions such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, severe depression, eating disorders and addiction.
Psychiatrists are the only mental health practitioners able to prescribe medication.

Psychologists: They work in a variety of settings with a vast range of people: they deal with everything from depression, anxiety and eating disorders to relationship problems and personal growth. Psychologists are experts in human behaviour. They use scientific methods to study the factors that influence the way we think, feel, learn and behave. They can provide guidance and support, give perspective, and teach coping strategies to people experiencing things like significant change, stress, illness, grief, learning difficulties, behavioural problems, substance abuse, relationship breakdowns, and so on. Under the Australian Psychology Society’s Code of Ethics, psychologists must provide services only in their areas of competence.

https://thewest.com.au/lifestyle/health-wellbeing/australian-list-of-top-10-most-prescribed-drugs-revealed-ng-b88679461z

Cholesterol-fighting drugs continue to be the most used medicines in Australia, with two common statins dispensed more than twenty million times in twelve months. But the prescription drugs causing the biggest dent in the Federal Government’s expenses are those treating the liver viral infection hepatitis C — costing more than two point three billion dollars in the past financial year. The latest figures from the NPS MedicineWise program, published in the journal Australian Prescriber, show cholesterol and blood pressure-lowering drugs still dominate the top ten drugs, based on prescription counts for two thousand sixteen and two thousand seventeen.

Topping the list were two statins — the cholesterol-lowering medicines recommended for those at risk of cardiovascular disease. Atorvastatin was the most dispensed, with ten point three million prescriptions, while rosuvastatin was prescribed ten point two million times. The figures are based on prescriptions under the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme but for the first time include prescriptions that are not subsidised, resulting in some drugs such as the antibiotic amoxicillin appearing in the top ten drugs for the first time. Other drugs in the top ten most prescribed were drugs to treat reflux and peptic ulcers and the type two diabetes medicine metformin.

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