The Health News USA August 5 2017

Overview

  • A new study by a team of researchers from Stanford University sheds light on chronic fatigue syndrome, which is estimated to affect over 836,000 Americans and has no known cure or cause. Chronic fatigue syndrome or also know as ME/CFS is a debilitating illness characterized by overwhelming fatigue that is not improved by rest.
  • A new study published in the journal Menopause suggests that women exposed to more estrogen over their lifetime including those who use hormonal birth control for many years may be somewhat protected from that increased risk of experiencing depression during and after menopause.
  • Until 1993 there was no treatment available for multiple sclerosis, with doctors turning to steroids to manage patients’ symptoms. But over the past several years, there’s been an influx of new disease-modifying agents for MS, which affects more than 2 million people worldwide. Ocrevus is the first treatment approved for MS.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 5th of August 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health New

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/study-sheds-light-chronic-fatigue-syndrome/story?id=48959336

A new study by a team of researchers from Stanford University sheds light on chronic fatigue syndrome, which is estimated to affect over eight hundred thirty six thousand Americans and has no known cure or cause, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Chronic fatigue syndrome or also known as Myalgic encephalomyelitis or chron is a debilitating illness characterized by overwhelming fatigue that is not improved by rest, according to the CDC.The cause of chronic fatigue syndrome has baffled researchers for decades, and the CDC estimates that approximately ninety percent of people with ME/CFS have not been diagnosed.

Doctor Jose Montoya, the lead author of the study, published Monday in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, said that chronic fatigue syndrome can turn a life of productive activity into one of dependency and desolation.

ABC News’ senior medical contributor, Doctor Jennifer Ashton, said that the study should encourage patients with ME/CFS that researchers have not ignored their pain, even if many questions surrounding the disease remain. The new research may encourage patients who have felt the disease was all in their head.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/how-birth-control-might-protect-you-from-depression-later-in-life/ar-AAoVJXr

Women are at increased risk for depression during periods of hormonal fluctuation, such as pregnancy, after childbirth, and at the end of their childbearing years. Now, a new study suggests that women exposed to more estrogen over their lifetime—including those who use hormonal birth control for many years—may be somewhat protected from that increased risk during and after menopause. The study, published in the journal Menopause, may help explain why some women experience mood changes during these transitions while others breeze through, seemingly unaffected, say the study authors. Previous studies have suggested that reproductive hormones play a role in depression risk, but this is the first to look at specific sources of those hormones over time.

To do so, researchers analyzed data from one thousand three hundred premenopausal women, ages forty two to fifty two at the study’s start, who were followed for about ten years. The women answered questions about their birth control use, the number of pregnancies they had, whether they breastfed, and when they first got their periods—all things that would influence the amount of estradiol (a form of estrogen) they were exposed to over the years.

Other studies have also linked birth control pills to worse mood and quality of life, at least for some women. Lead author Doctor Wendy Marsh, associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Massachusetts Medical School says these seemingly conflicting findings show the relationship between birth control and mood is complex, and still not well understood.

Doctor Marsh also stresses that, even though hormonal transitions do raise the risk of depression, it’s still not something that most women experience during these times. She states that most women do not get depressed during menopause but we’re delighted to be able to contribute to the understanding of why that increased risk does exist, and who it affects the most.

http://www.foxnews.com/health/2017/08/02/newly-approved-ms-drug-changing-treatment-landscape.html

Multiple sclerosis infusion gives hope to patients. Believe it or not, until nineteen ninety three there was no treatment available for multiple sclerosis, with doctors turning to steroids to manage patients’ symptoms. But over the past several years, there’s been an influx of new disease-modifying agents for MS, which affects more than two million people worldwide.

Doctor Ellen Lathi, director of the Elliot Lewish Center in Massachusetts, told Fox News that when MS therapeutics were new, there was a tendency to start with lower potency medications and escalate to a higher potency agent only if the patient with MS continued to worsen. She also said that now most MS specialists believe that it is best to start more potent medication earlier in the disease in many patients to avoid future disability.

Mike Logan, a forty eight-year-old broadcaster and teacher in Boston. He was diagnosed in nineteen ninety three and struggles with mobility and balance, and also has bladder and bowel issues. He said his doctors believe he has the progressive form of MS, but he didn’t need to take medications until two thousand fifteen. Logan stated that his condition had started to worsen over the last two years, and he was looking for anything that might slow the progression of the disease,” He enrolled in a clinical trial for a now-FDA-approved drug called Ocrevus by Genentech, Incorporated. The drug is administered in a three-hour infusion just twice per year.

Ocrevus is the first treatment approved for MS. In Logan’s portion of the trial, four hundred eighty eight patients were studied. It found patients were twenty four percent less likely to have worsening symptoms compared to those who took a placebo.

 

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