The Health News USA February 5 2018

  • Indiana has announced last Friday that it will require its Medicaid recipients work or do some other form of community engagement, becoming the second state to make this fundamental change to the 50-year-old health insurance program for the poor. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services said it approved Indiana’s waiver to add these requirements to its Medicaid program on Friday. According to the HHS, the work requirement applies to able-bodied working age Medicaid enrollees.
  • A mediation session is scheduled for next week for coffee retailers — including Starbucks and BP — that haven’t yet agreed to comply with the state of California’s plan for informing consumers about the beverage’s potential cancer risk. The San Francisco Chronicle has reported that so far, thirteen coffee sellers, including 7-Eleven, have agreed to post warning signs, as mandated by the state. But some coffee retailers are fighting back against the plan, which was prompted by a lawsuit filed in 2010 by the Council for Education and Research in Toxics.
  • People around the country wore red last Friday in order to raise awareness about our hearts, women’s heart health to be exact. Started in 2004, “Go Red For Women” is an annual campaign to bring attention that heart disease, while the No. 1 cause of death in the nation, is also the No. 1 killer of women, with 1 in 4 dying from heart complications, according to the CDC . It’s also the No. 1 killer for African-American and white women, and has equal death rates to cancer for Latina women.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 5th of February 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-healthcare-medicaid-indiana/indiana-to-impose-medicaid-work-requirements-idUSKBN1FM2MC

Indiana has announced last Friday that it will require its Medicaid recipients work or do some other form of community engagement, becoming the second state to make this fundamental change to the fifty-year-old health insurance program for the poor. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services said it approved Indiana’s waiver to add these requirements to its Medicaid program on Friday. According to the HHS, the work requirement applies to able-bodied working age Medicaid enrollees.

Pregnant women, medically frail enrollees, students, some caregivers and people in substance use treatment are among those that are exempted from the requirements. Kentucky became the first state to impose work requirements on its Medicaid recipients last month. At least eight additional states, mostly Republican-led, have proposed similar changes to Medicaid: Arizona, Arkansas, Kansas, Maine, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Utah and Wisconsin.

http://www.foxnews.com/health/2018/02/02/opponents-californias-coffee-cancer-warnings-to-face-mediation-next-week.html

A mediation session is scheduled for next week for coffee retailers — including Starbucks and BP — that haven’t yet agreed to comply with the state of California’s plan for informing consumers about the beverage’s potential cancer risk. The San Francisco Chronicle has reported that so far, thirteen coffee sellers, including Seven-Eleven, have agreed to post warning signs, as mandated by the state. But some coffee retailers are fighting back against the plan, which was prompted by a lawsuit filed in two thousand ten by the Council for Education and Research in Toxics (or CERT).

CERT seeks to force coffee retailers to post warning signs, citing the requirements of Proposition sixty five, a plan passed by voters in nineteen eighty six that requires businesses to inform customers of the cancer risks in their products. Coffee contains traces of acrylamide, a chemical formed during the roasting process that CERT believes is cancerous. The American Cancer Society has conducted several case studies on acrylamide since two thousand two, but found no definitive proof of a correlation with cancer.

https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2018/feb/2/women-wear-red-heart-health-awareness/

People around the country wore red last Friday in order to raise awareness about our hearts, women’s heart health to be exact. Started in two thousand four, “Go Red For Women” is an annual campaign to bring attention that heart disease, while the Number one cause of death in the nation, is also the Number one killer of women, with one in four dying from heart complications, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

It’s also the Number one killer for African-American and white women, and has equal death rates to cancer for Latina women.The American Heart Association which launched the campaign, seeks to raise two million dollars for educational outreach and research. Diabetes, being overweight or obese, a poor diet, limited physical activity and excessive alcohol use are all risk factors greatly increasing the likelihood of a cardiac event. Health experts recommend people to speak to their doctors about a number of issues that can help limit the chance of suffering a heart attack or stroke.

Last year, the AHA released updated guidelines for blood pressure screening, putting healthy blood pressure as below one hundred twenty over eighty.

The AHA recommends that all women schedule an annual physical with their doctor, called a “Well-Women visit” and points out that preventive services are covered under Medicaid and Medicare with no co-pay.

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