The Health News USA September 5 2017

Overview

  • One in every 13 Americans depends on community health center services from approximately 1,400 organizations nationwide. Maryland’s Health Centers serve over thousand 300,000 patients at seventeen organizations with about one hundred twenty five care delivery sites across the state.
  • Since the 1970’s, most major nutrition and health guidelines have cautioned against eating too much sodium, citing associations with high blood pressure that could lead to heart attack and stroke.
  • Hurricane Harvey’s historic floods have killed dozens of people. Disasters, whether natural (like hurricanes and floods) or man-made (like wars), can cause tremendous upheaval in people’s lives. For kids, they may be even more distressing. Losing a home for a kid may mean losing the only home he or she has ever had.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 5th of  September 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/opinion/oped/bs-ed-op-0904-community-health-centers-20170831-story.html

As the US struggles to coordinate health care needs with political designs, it is critical that we remember the necessity of open, welcoming care for all communities, especially those who have been historically marginalized and continue to face barriers to a healthy life. Community health centers provide essential health care to more than twenty four million people in rural and urban communities, the majority of whom struggle with access to health care. One in every thirteen Americans depends on community health center services from approximately one thousand four hundred sister organizations nationwide. Maryland’s Health Centers serve over three hundred thousand patients at seventeen organizations with about one hundred twenty five care delivery sites across the state. Maryland Health Centers are present in Baltimore City and almost every Maryland county. Maryland health centers provide high quality, comprehensive care to some of the most vulnerable populations in the state.

It would be an understatement to say the work community health centers do in Baltimore is vital. In two thousand fifteen, the most recent year for which data is available, the city’s six Federally Qualified Health Centers or FQHCs served a total of one hundred forty five thousand nine hundred sixty four patients. Of those patients, an average of ninety eight point five percent live at or below two hundred percent of the federal poverty line. Serving some of Baltimore’s most in-need patients gives community health centers a distinct advantage over most health institutions. Maryland health centers get one point seven million dollars in federal funding.

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/09/03/547827356/has-salt-gotten-an-unfair-shake-sodium-partisans-say-yes

For such a simple compound, salt is complicated. Sodium is a key element in table salt, and it’s also essential for life. It helps regulate our blood volume. It shuttles nutrients into our bodies and brains. It allows our muscles to contract and our nerves to pulse with electricity. Yet for decades, we’ve been told to avoid it. Since the nineteen seventies, most major nutrition and health guidelines have cautioned against eating too much sodium, citing associations with high blood pressure that could lead to heart attack and stroke. Recommendations put forward from the Institute of Medicine — now called the National Academy of Medicine — and jointly by the Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Agriculture in particular have consistently urged us to restrict sodium intake to two point three grams per day, equivalent to about one teaspoon of salt. Some recommendations even go as low as one point five grams for certain people.

Yet on average, Americans eat three point four grams per day, mostly cloaked by the fine print on processed food. High blood pressure does indeed up the risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality in most people. But in many areas of medicine, accepted beliefs often get rewritten as new evidence emerges. Cholesterol is bad for us. No it’s not. Saturated fat is surely killing us all. Actually, a little might be okay. Some health researchers believe it’s salt’s turn for a reappraisal and point to studies suggesting that more salt doesn’t necessarily mean more heart disease.
Participants in a recent study with the highest intake of sodium and potassium actually had significantly lower blood pressure, according to an analysis presented earlier this year at the American Society for Nutrition’s Scientific Sessions meeting in Chicago. The group with the lowest blood pressure averaged a daily sodium intake of three point seven grams a day, far higher than the guidelines suggest.

http://edition.cnn.com/2017/09/01/health/disasters-children-recover-trauma-partner/index.html

Hurricane Harvey’s historic floods have killed dozens of people. As of Thursday, an estimated thirty two thousand more had been evacuated into shelters, and approximately two hundred two thousand had registered with the Federal Emergency Management Agency for assistance.
Disasters, whether natural (like hurricanes and floods) or man-made (like wars), can cause tremendous upheaval in people’s lives. For kids, they may be even more distressing. Losing a home for a kid may mean losing the only home he or she has ever had. According to the United Nations, young people, including children, are the largest group of people affected by disasters across the world. Over one hundred million youth around the world are exposed to disasters each year. In the United States, it’s estimated that approximately fourteen percent of children will experience a disaster in childhood. It’s very common for children to report symptoms of post-traumatic stress, depression and anxiety after a disaster. These symptoms might look like nightmares or flashbacks to the disaster, avoiding reminders of the event or being more worried about events in general.

Children may also have trouble in school or be more sedentary. Very young children do not have well-developed verbal skills, and they may not be able to describe their own emotional distress.
A child’s exposure to stressors during and immediately after the disaster is a key factor that predicts whether he or she will struggle after potentially traumatic events. Changes in academic performance, how often they’re seeing friends, or less enjoyment of favorite activities can all be warning signs that children may be struggling after a disaster.Stressors such as parents changing jobs or someone in the family becoming ill tend to increase after disasters, and they can make recovering from a disaster even harder for children. Adults should be aware of that and teach children coping skills like identifying feelings and problem-solving.

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