The Health News USA October 24 2017

  • It’s still business as usual for Connecticut’s health insurance marketplace, despite failed congressional efforts to repeal and replace former President Barack Obama’s health care law and President Donald Trump’s proposal to stop federal payments to insurers. Access Health CT is continuing to gear up for this year’s shortened open enrollment period, which runs from November 1 to December 22.
  • A Florida nursing home that charged one of its residents who died when Hurricane Irma created sweltering conditions at the facility has blamed an automatic payment system for the error, and claims that the family has been refunded. The Sun Sentinel has reported that the relatives of Albertina Vega, who was a resident at the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills, said they were shocked to see the bank withdrawal and subsequent overdraft fee on her account.
  • This time of year invariably turns thoughts to all matters frightful and what it means to face our fears — whether you’re a devout fan of the horror flick genre, holding a séance or simply considering a macabre costume. Recent times have tasked us with facing our fears more than ever, in a way. As counterintuitive as it sounds, fear can feel good to some people. It releases dopamine, a feel-good chemical — in the bodies of certain individuals.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 24th of  October 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

http://www.sfchronicle.com/news/article/Despite-Washington-Connecticut-health-exchange-12297274.php

It’s still business as usual for Connecticut’s health insurance marketplace, despite failed congressional efforts to repeal and replace former President Barack Obama’s health care law and President Donald Trump’s proposal to stop federal payments to insurers. Access Health CT is continuing to gear up for this year’s shortened open enrollment period, which runs from November one to December twenty two. As part of its stepped-up outreach campaign, Access Health CT is making it clear they’re open for business. They’re stressing the importance of keeping or obtaining health insurance and making people aware that financial assistance is still available. They’re also underscoring that rates offered for two thousand eighteen plans will not be affected by Trump’s attempt to shut off the payments which help subsidize copays and deductibles.”We know that now, more than ever, people are confused with the mixed messages,” said Andrea Ravitz, Access Health CT’s marketing director.
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Established as part of Obama’s two thousand ten Affordable Care Act, Access Health CT has grown to serve about ninety eight thousand individuals and has managed to keep two insurers on board — Anthem and ConnectiCare — despite market challenges. Jim Wadleigh, the exchange’s CEO, said his staff members support customers who enrolled in two thousand sixteen and those eligible to enroll throughout this year. They’re also busy planning for the two thousand eighteen open enrollment period. He noted they do this amid daily uncertainty about the program. Both Access Health CT and the state’s Department of Insurance have taken steps to blunt the impact from such “noise.”

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Wadleigh said twenty five percent of Access Health CT’s customers do not receive financial assistance and about one-third are enrolled in silver plans. He said they’ll likely be most affected by premium increases. In some cases, families that don’t receive subsidies could face spending nearly fourteen percent or more of their income on health care.

http://www.foxnews.com/health/2017/10/20/florida-nursing-home-bills-resident-who-died-during-hurricane-irma.html

A Florida nursing home that charged one of its residents who died when Hurricane Irma created sweltering conditions at the facility has blamed an automatic payment system for the error, and claims that the family has been refunded. The Sun Sentinel has reported that the relatives of Albertina Vega, who was a resident at the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills, said they were shocked to see the bank withdrawal and subsequent overdraft fee on her account.
Vega, who was ninety nine at the time of her death, was charged nine hundred fifty eight dollars on what would have been her one hundredth birthday. Carmen Fernandez, a relative, said she saw the charge and fee when she went to close the woman’s account, the news outlet reported.

Vega was one of the fourteen residents who died when the facility’s central air conditioning failed during the hurricane. She was living on the second floor of the nursing home, which did not have air conditioning for three days, the news outlet reported. Hollywood police and the Florida Department of Law Enforcement launched an investigation into the deaths, but Fernandez wonders if Medicaid has also been billed for Vega’s care, or if the other victims have received similar bills. The state’s Agency for Health Care Administration would not comment on the incident, but said the facility was suspended from the Medicaid program in September, according to The Sun Sentinel. Fernandez said she filed a complaint with the bank manager, while a spokeswoman for the nursing home said the billing was part of an automated system that was beyond the facility’s control.

https://www.nbcnews.com/better/health/fondness-fear-why-do-we-be-scared-ncna812661

This time of year always turns thoughts to all matters frightful and what it means to face our fears — whether you’re a devout fan of the horror flick genre, holding a séance or simply considering a macabre costume. Recent times have tasked us with facing our fears more than ever, in a way. With terms like “massacre” bandied about so often, the recently released Survey of American Fears from Chapman University reflects how our biggest fears are basically a checklist comprised of daily headlines: topping this year’s list of biggest fears are corrupt government officials , losing our health care and environmental pollution (conditions are now ripe for even more of a check). When real life can mimic a horror movie, we’re constantly reminded about the fragility of our existence. Yet that’s not enough of a scare for those who still feel compelled to seek out frightening experiences — even find them cathartic.

As counterintuitive as it sounds, fear can feel good to some people. It releases dopamine — a feel-good chemical — in the bodies of certain individuals, says Margee Kerr, PhD, sociologist and author of SCREAM: Chilling Adventures in the Science of Fear. Christopher Bader, professor of sociology at Chapman University and one of the authors of above-mentioned survey, agrees. “Fear responses produce endorphins, which can be a sort of natural high,” he explains. Scientists have long examined fear from a physiological perspective. According to a two thousand seven study, every brain experiences fear and anxiety (because the overruling emotion in anxiety is fear) differently — and you may be more vulnerable to it depending on how your brain is shaped. Your amygdala, the part of your brain that houses the prefrontal cortex, is in charge of what makes you afraid and how you choose to express it. People who suffer from anxiety already have prefrontal cortexes that look a little different than other folks.

Kerr says other “feel good” chemicals can also come into play with fear, namely endorphins, dopamine, serotonin and oxytocin. “The neurotransmitters and hormones that are released are helping us prepare to fight or flee, at the same time our attention is shifting away from abstract thoughts and focusing on issues of survival,” explains Kerr.

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