The Health News United Kingdom January 14 2018

  • According to Public Health England figures, hospitals in England are now seeing very high rates of patients with flu. A sharp rise in cases seen by GPs in the past week – up 78% on the week before – suggests it could be the worst flu season for 7 years.  Deaths from flu remained static with 27 in the past 7 days. The rate of hospital admissions in England rose by over 50% in the first week of January to 7.38 per 100,000.
  • Government plans to cut public health funding by £170 million over 2 years, with local authorities losing out on £85 million in 2018-2019 and another £85 million in 2019-2020. This translates to a 5% cut compared to current local authority allocations, with high-spender Birmingham set to lose the largest amount –  £4.8 million over 2 years.
  • Three GPs a day are seeking help for ‘meltdowns’ as they struggle to take on the workloads of growing doctor vacancies. Some 981 GPs referred themselves to the GP Health Service, which was set up to help doctors suffering from stress or burnout, between the end of November and the service’s launch on January 30, 2017.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 14th of January 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-42652675

According to Public Health England figures, hospitals in England are now seeing very high rates of patients with flu. A sharp rise in cases seen by general practitioners in the past week – up seventy eight percent on the week before – suggests it could be the worst flu season for seven years.

….
Deaths from flu remained static with twenty seven in the past seven days. Around five thousand people were admitted to hospital with flu in the first week of January, based on PHE figures for twenty two out of one hundred thirty seven trusts.
….
The strains of flu are an unknown type of influenza A and influenza B – which is normally a milder strain – but appears to be affecting older people in care homes. The HthreeNtwo strain – an influenza A virus – has been dubbed ‘Aussie flu’ because it is the same strain that recently caused big problems for Australia during their winter.


The rate of hospital admissions in England rose by over fifty percent in the first week of January to seven point thirty eight per one hundred thousand. In the same week, the GP consultation rate was thirty seven point three per one hundred thousand compared to twenty one per one hundred thousand the week before. Nearly twenty two thousand patients went to see their GP with flu in the first week of two thousand eighteen, the Royal College of GPs said, and there was also a rise in people seen with the common cold, acute bronchitis, respiratory system diseases and asthma.

http://www.pulsetoday.co.uk/home/finance-and-practice-life-news/public-health-budget-to-be-slashed-by-5-over-next-two-years/20035939.article

Government plans to cut public health funding by one hundred seventy million pounds over two years, with local authorities losing out on eighty five million pounds in two thousand eighteen and two thousand nineteen and another eighty five million pounds in two thousand nineteen and two thousand twenty.

This translates to a five percent cut compared to current local authority allocations, with high-spender Birmingham set to lose the largest amount – four point eight million pounds over two years. The news comes as health secretary Jeremy Hunt had social care added to his secretary of state responsibilities in the recent Cabinet reshuffle. The allocations, which form part of a plan to realise the Chancellor’s two thousand fifteen autumn budget decision to slash public health budgets by nine point six percent over five years between two thousand sixteen and two thousand seventeen and two thousand twenty and two thousand twenty one, were announced at the end of last month.

The Government announced a major cut to public health budgets in two thousand fifteen, when it was slashed by two hundred million pounds amid a raft of measures to ‘bring down public debt’.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-5254493/Three-GPs-day-seeking-help-meltdowns.html

Three general practitioners a day are seeking help for ‘meltdowns’ as they struggle to take on the workloads of growing doctor vacancies. Some nine hundred eighty one GPs referred themselves to the GP Health Service, which was set up to help doctors suffering from stress or burnout, between the end of November and the service’s launch on January thirty, two thousand seventeen.

‘Practice meltdown’ is the most common reason for self-referral, according to the service’s chief executive Lucy Warner. GPs are making themselves ill by being too eager to take on the workloads of unfilled positions, causing them to buckle under the pressure, General Practitioners Committee chairman Doctor Richard Vautrey said, describing the situation as a ‘baptism of fire’. Research carried out last year revealed nearly twelve percent of GP positions are vacant in the UK, up from six point four percent in two thousand fourteen.  

According to Doctor Vautrey, newly-qualified GPs are being put in situations experienced doctors would struggle to cope with. He added the use of the GP Health Service highlights the need to address workload pressures so doctors can practice safely without putting themselves or their patients at risk.

….
Other reasons GPs are seeking help include receiving official complaints or discovering they have made a mistake as result of their own mental health problems. Younger GPs are also requiring assistance as they generally struggle to cope with the workloads and pressures of the job.  

0 Comments

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.