The Health News USA August 29 2017

Overview

  • As a court fight simmers over New York City’s pioneering requirement for calorie counts on chain restaurant menus, scientists say the jury’s still out on whether giving people the numbers spurs them to eat healthier.
  • According to a new poll, 1 in 3 U.S. parents admits to worrying about bullying and cyberbullying. It involves more than 1,500 parents of children and teens found one-third very concerned about online bullying and how it could affect their child’s mental health.
  • Texas residents will still face a host of potential health problems from the flood water after Hurricane Harvey. The health concerns that floodwater can bring include physical and mental challenges.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 29th of August 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health New

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2017/aug/26/nyc-calorie-rule-scrutinized-in-courts-of-law-and-/

As a court fight simmers over New York City’s pioneering requirement for calorie counts on chain restaurant menus, there is still a debate whether giving people the numbers spurs them to eat healthier. The city says that by requiring eateries to tell people that their four dollar cheeseburger will also cost them about five hundred forty calories, it’s helping diners make informed choices in an era of rising obesity. New York City’s first-in-the-nation rule took full effect in two thousand eight. It was copied by other cities and counties and a half-dozen states and became part of President Barack Obama’s two thousand ten health care overhaul. The repeatedly delayed federal regulation, which extends to grocery and convenience store chain menus, is now set to take effect next year. But plenty of opponents to the idea remain, including some who question its effectiveness.Studies to date haven’t conclusively shown that restaurant-goers, on the whole, actually order lighter foods when the calorie tally is right there. It appears to influence some people, in some settings, and possibly restaurants’ recipes, researchers say.

About one million New Yorkers see calorie data every day, according to Health Department research, and a two thousand eleven Quinnipiac University poll found seventy nine percent of city voters found the information useful. But some individual studies have found effects. Some Stanford University business professors’ two thousand ten examination of over one hundred million Starbucks purchases found that menu postings trimmed the calories in customers’ orders by an average of six percent, from two hundred forty seven to two hundred thirty two. In another example, a two thousand thirteen study in Seattle and surrounding King County found some calorie-cutting, though particularly by women and customers who said they took menu postings into account when ordering.

https://www.upi.com/Health_News/2017/08/26/Poll-1-in-3-US-parents-worry-about-cyberbullying/4401503774318/

With school bells ringing once again, one in three U.S. parents admits to worrying about bullying and cyberbullying. A new poll involving more than one thousand five hundred parents of children and teens found one-third very concerned about online bullying and how it could affect their child’s mental health. Experts have warned about the link between cyberbullying and anxiety, depression and suicide, the University of Michigan researchers pointed out.

Doctor Gary Freed, a professor of pediatrics at the University of Michigan said that adults across the country recognized bullying, including cyberbullying, as the leading health problem for U.S. children. Trailing closely behind cyberbullies on parents’ list of concerns are sedentary behavior, poor diet, drug abuse and car accidents, the researchers found. The poll included more than one thousand five hundred parents of children eighteen or younger. Internet safety, including online predators, is also a major concern among parents of children and teens, the researchers discovered. All of the parents polled were highly concerned about car accidents, which are the leading cause of death for children two to fourteen years old. Parents’ anxiety also depended on their race and their children’s age, the poll showed. According to the the researchers, racial inequalities and school violence were leading concerns among black parents.

http://edition.cnn.com/2017/08/27/health/health-consequences-flood-waters/index.html

Even after Hurricane Harvey’s immediate flooding threat goes away, Texas residents will still face a host of potential health problems from the water -and from what the water leaves behind. Health and Human Services Secretary Doctor Tom Price declared a public health emergency in Texas on Sunday.

The health concerns that floodwater can bring include physical and mental challenges.
Floodwater is more than simple rain. It’s often contaminated with sewage and chemicals and can hide sharp objects made of metal or glass. Floodwater can also carry disease. That’s a serious problem in developing countries where cholera, typhoid or yellow fever are already present, according to the World Health Organization. None of those diseases are common in Texas, so an outbreak is highly unlikely. Using items that have been submerged in the water can also cause stomach problems. To cut down on infection, the CDC reminds parents not to let their children play with toys that have been in the water, unless the toys get washed thoroughly first.

People with open wounds also need to take extra care to keep them covered. Floodwater can easily cause a wound to become infected. Studies show that the biggest health concern from a flood, other than the immediate dangers of rushing waters, may be mental.  Hurricanes and flooding generate additional anxiety, depression and stress. Stress is common both during and after any natural disaster. Some people may develop problems related to the lingering challenges associated with post-traumatic stress disorder, but the majority of those affected should recover in time. People who have strong bonds with family, friends and co-workers tend to recover best, so the experts suggest paying close attention to those relationships to help speed recovery.

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