The Health News Australia September 1 2017

Overview

  • Australian Ironman Dean Mercer died because of a sudden cardiac attack at the age 47. According to Sydney cardiologist Dr. Ross Walker, too much exercise may not be healthy, especially after the age of 40.
  • Private hospital group Ramsay Health Care lifted full year profit 8.6% to $488.95 million on the back of growth in admissions in Australia.
  • Health experts have controversially called for an overhaul of dietary guidelines after a large international study found a diet high in carbohydrate is associated with greater risk of premature death, not a diet high in fat.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 1st of  September 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health New

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-08-29/if-youre-over-40-you-should-watch-how-much-you-exercise/8852514

The sudden death of Australian Ironman Dean Mercer has left many people asking how does a healthy athlete suffer a sudden cardiac arrest? Aged forty seven, Mercer was active and seemed in peak physical fitness for a middle-aged Australian — although his medical history is unknown. But Sydney cardiologist Doctor Ross Walker has warned that too much exercise may not be healthy, especially after the age of forty. As a heart specialist, Doctor Walker is a proponent of preventative cardiology — informing patients how to best reduce activities that put them at risk of a heart attack or cardiac arrest. He said while exercise was good for anyone, the problem for many was the amount of exercise.
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Australian experts find a big increase in patients having heart attacks but who have no risk factors such as high blood pressure, being obese or smoking. Doctor Walker said he suspected the reason too much exercise was not good for a person came down to stressing out the system. He said one theory was that excessive exercise resulted in chronic and recurrent damage to “a whole lot of muscles in the body”. If you are over forty, it’s best to get a regular cardiac assessment. Doctor Walker said his advice was for everyone as they get older to have regular check-ups to make sure their heart was up to the job. And he said it was not just athletes who should be getting cardiac assessments; anyone who wants to continue to do high level activities over the age of forty should get a regular assessment. The Heart Foundation said the best thing you can do to find out about your risk of heart disease is to see your doctor for a heart health check, which will include tests such as blood pressure, cholesterol, family history, weight and smoking status.

https://www.businessinsider.com.au/rising-private-hospital-admissions-are-creating-more-profits-for-ramsay-health-care-2017-8

Private hospital group Ramsay Health Care lifted full year profit eight point six percent to four hundred eighty eight point ninety five million dollars on the back of growth in admissions in Australia. The domestic Australian business grew strongly, with revenue up seven percent to four point seven billion dollars, but overall revenue was flat at eight point seven billion dollars, up just zero point two percent, on weaker growth in France and the UK. Core net profit after tax was up twelve point seven percent to five hundred forty two point seven million dollars. The company has two hundred twenty one hospitals, twenty five thousand beds, two hundred pharmacies and sixty thousand staff.

“Australia remains the powerhouse of our business and delivered another year of impressive earnings growth, driven by strong demand and our brownfield developments,” says managing director Craig McNally.

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Globally, Ramsay has three hundred eighty five million dollars in projects under construction and due for completion over the next two years. Ramsay is targeting core earnings per share growth of eight percent to ten percent for two thousand eighteen. The company declared a final fully franked dividend of eighty one point five cents, bringing the full year payout to one hundred thirty four point five cents, up  thirteen percent.

http://www.9news.com.au/health/2017/08/29/19/01/high-carb-diet-worse-than-high-fat-study

Health experts have controversially called for an overhaul of dietary guidelines after a large international study found a diet high in carbohydrate is associated with greater risk of premature death, not a diet high in fat. A study of more than one hundred thirty five thousand people from eighteen countries, published in the respected medical journal The Lancet, found diets high in carbohydrates were associated with a twenty eight percent higher risk of death, compared to low carbohydrate diets. Diets with a high total fat intake were associated with a twenty three percent lower risk of death, compared to low fat.

“Total fat and types of fat were not associated with cardiovascular disease, myocardial infarction, or cardiovascular disease mortality, whereas saturated fat had an inverse association with stroke. Global dietary guidelines should be reconsidered in light of these findings,” the authors concluded. The current guidelines recommend that fifty to sixty five percent of a person’s daily calories come from carbohydrates, and less than ten percent from saturated fats.
The study found the average global diet consisted of at least sixty percent carbohydrate.
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The study conclusions have received a mixed reaction from Australian health experts.
Professor Amanda Lee – a senior advisor at The Australian Prevention Partnership Centre – says a major limitation of the study is that it does not mention what foods the macronutrients came from. The experienced nutritionist suggests that it’s carbohydrate from added sugars and refined grains that is “problematic” and said the findings may not translate in Australia.

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