The Health News Australia August 4 2017

Overview

  • SA Health has said that a childcare centre and a school in Adelaide have “sent out alarmist and inaccurate information” about meningococcal after a two-year-old girl was admitted to hospital with the disease. SA Health said 9 people who had direct contact with the child, who was admitted to hospital in a critical condition, had received clearance antibiotics.
  • High street retailer Next is recalling a pair of children’s shoes after they were found to contain a potentially harmful substance called benzidine which might cause cancer. The ACCC on Wednesday confirmed that the hazard referred to by Next is benzidine, a man-made chemical used in fabric and leather dyes. According to the NHS, exposure to benzidine is thought to increase the risk of bladder cancer.
  • Debate has erupted over whether morbidly obese models should be banned from fashion runways after doctors warned “drastically overweight” super models send health messages that are just as dangerous as those who are underweight. Doctor Frankum, the Australia Medical Association New South Wales president, told The Daily Telegraph there was a “fine line” between “being confident” and promoting unhealthy messages.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 4th of August 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health New

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-08-03/meningococcal-case-in-adelaide-childcare-centre/8769788

A childcare centre and a school in Adelaide have “sent out alarmist and inaccurate information” about meningococcal after a two-year-old girl was admitted to hospital with the disease, South Australia Health has said. SA Health said nine people who had direct contact with the child, who was admitted to hospital in a critical condition, had received clearance antibiotics.

Chief medical officer Professor Paddy Phillips said people had been incorrectly advised to see their General Practitioners by Goodstart Early Learning at Salisbury North. He said that we’re a little bit concerned that the childcare centre didn’t contact us first before they sent out information, and similarly a local school and that there was no increased risk from this child to the kids at the childcare centre, and absolutely no increased risk to the members of the public or the kids at the local school.

Goodstart’s National Safe Work and Wellbeing manager Kylie Warren-Wright said the organisation was working with SA Health, but said anyone with concerns should still contact their local GPs. Here are the symptoms of meningococcal or meningitis: fever, headache, neck pain or stiffness, pain from lights and drowsiness or confusion.

There have been twenty one cases of the disease reported in South Australia this year, compared to thirteen at the same time last year.

Thirteen of the cases this year have been the B strain, five have been the W strain and two have been the Y strain.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/news/next-recall-children-shoes-cancerous-lining-benzidine-australia-health-safety-a7873641.html

High street retailer Next is recalling a pair of children’s shoes after they were found to contain a potentially harmful substance which might cause cancer. The retail giant published a statement asking for customers to return ‘Younger Boys Navy Brogue’ shoes after they were found to contain a quantity of a “restricted substance” which exceeds the group’s specifications.

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, a product safety body in Australia, on Wednesday confirmed that the hazard referred to by Next is benzidine, a man-made chemical used in fabric and leather dyes. According to the National Health Service, exposure to benzidine is thought to increase the risk of bladder cancer.

A US health study in two thousand one suggests the chemical can enter the body through small particles in the air. Skin contact with the chemical also increases the risk of cancer.

Benzidine has not been sold in the US since the nineteen seventies and its hazardous nature means it is no longer used in plastics and medical laboratories. Next said in a public recall notice that they we’re very sorry for any disappointment and inconvenience caused.

This is not the first time the retailer has had to recall childrens shoes. Earlier this year, Next publically recalled a pair of children’s sandals after fears a detachable rivet could be swallowed.

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/entertainment/sydney-confidential/health-officials-worried-extremely-overweight-models-taking-to-runway-glorifies-obesity/news-story/be5d484890246461dcbae670d9c6cbc9

Debate has erupted over whether morbidly obese models should be banned from fashion runways after doctors warned “drastically overweight” super models send health messages that are just as dangerous as those who are underweight. The state’s top doctor Brad Frankum fears the growing popularity of “extremely overweight” models is glorifying obesity, likening the use of overweight models to advertisements with cigarettes. The row comes as an opinion piece by

The Daily Telegraph’s Sydney Confidential online editor Soraiya Fuda criticising the use of obese models went viral yesterday. Australian Victoria’s Secret model Bridget Malcolm also has spoken out about the pressures facing young models, calling for a ban on cosmetic surgeries on girls under eighteen. In her piece, Miss Fuda slammed a recent Sports Illustrated fashion parade which used models “who appeared to be approaching the sizes twenty to twenty six as “irresponsible”. She said: “My argument here cuts both ways. If the fashion industry decides to stop using models who appear to have starved themselves to skin and bones — as they should — they shouldn’t then choose to promote an equally unhealthy body shape.” But “fat activists” have hit back arguing overweight women already face “so much discrimination” it is impossible to “glorify obesity”.

Doctor Frankum, the Australia Medical Association New South Wales president, told The Daily Telegraph there was a “fine line” between “being confident” and promoting unhealthy messages.

Doctor Frankum said a better message would be sent by seeing more models who were a healthy size neither overweight or underweight  on runways rather than “celebrating extremes”. Butterfly Foundation chief executive Christine Morgan, however, said “acceptance of diversity” should be encouraged and a person’s health shouldn’t be determined by their physical shape or size as this reaffirms social stereotypes and creates societal assumptions. “Health experts are the only people who can truly able determine a person’s health. But a two thousand fifteen study from the Simon Fraser University in Canada found advertising campaigns that lent towards using ‘plus-size’ models were having a  harmful effect on the public’s lifestyle and eating behaviour. The study found women who had been shown the advert with a plus-size model with a reaffirming message were more likely to make “higher calorie and poorer exercise” choices.

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