The Health News Australia December 20 2017

  • It’s been revealed more Australians are dying from prescription drugs than illegal street drugs. Last year alone, there were close to 2,000 deaths as a result of prescription pills, a new reports from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) has found –  which is a rise of 168% in 10 years. The reports also found around 1 million Australians over the age of 14 had misused a pharmaceutical drug in the past 12 months and the non-medical use of those type of drugs was higher than all illegal drugs except cannabis.
  • La Trobe University and Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute will spearhead one of the world’s first population-based studies to advance understanding of the progression of diabetic complications in people with type two diabetes. The researchers will recruit one thousand five hundred adults across metropolitan and regional Victoria with type two diabetes over the coming two years as part of the $2 million dollar study.
  • In Australia, all products that purport to kill or repel mosquitoes must be registered by the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority. Check the packaging for a registration number. There are dozens of different variations on “mosquito coils” including sticks, coils, candles and a variety of “smokeless” plug in devices. Fortunately, some of the more dangerous chemicals found in mosquito coils are not used in products produced and sold locally in Australia.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 20th of December 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

https://www.9news.com.au/national/2017/12/19/00/41/more-aussies-dying-from-prescription-pills-than-illegal-drugs

It’s been revealed more Australians are dying from prescription drugs than illegal street drugs. Last year alone, there were close to two thousand deaths as a result of prescription pills, a new report from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) has found –  which is a rise of one hundred sixty eight percent in ten years. AIHW spokesperson Matthew James said in a statement: “In two thousand sixteen there were one thousand eight hundred eight drug-induced deaths in Australia with benzodiazepines the most common single drug type, identified in six hundred sixty three drug-induced deaths.”

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The reports also found around one million Australians over the age of fourteen had misused a pharmaceutical drug in the past twelve months and the non-medical use of those types of drugs were higher than all illegal drugs except cannabis. Of the one million who misused, twenty eight percent did so daily or weekly. The report also found people living in ‘remote’ and ‘very remote’ areas were almost twice as likely as those living in major cities to have recently used a pharmaceutical for non-medical purposes.

https://healthtimes.com.au/hub/diabetes/23/news/nc1/worldfirst-type-2-diabetic-complications-study/3088/

La Trobe University and Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute will spearhead one of the world’s first population-based studies to advance understanding of the progression of diabetic complications in people with type two diabetes. The researchers will recruit one thousand five hundred adults across metropolitan and regional Victoria with type two diabetes over the coming two years as part of the two million dollar study.

Together with collaborators from Monash University, Centre for Eye Research Australia and Deakin University, they will continue to study these participants for the next five to ten years to track the development of any complications of their diabetes. Adjunct Professor and diabetes expert at the Baker Institute, Professor Jonathan Shaw, said the study aimed to gain a better understanding of what drives the development of diabetic complications in some people and not others.
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Professor Shaw said he was unaware of any other studies having taken a population-based approach to understand diabetes complications, whereby study participants are representative of the full spectrum of people with type two diabetes.
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Researchers hope that the study will lead to new ways of treating diabetes, with the findings to assist in directing resources, such as new medications, to those who are identified early as being at risk. The study will also examine some less well-known complications of diabetes.

This study is an important follow-up to the well-known AusDiab Study, which involves eleven thousand Australians being tested by the Baker Institute over a twelve-year period. The study was the first national Australian population-based study to examine the prevalence and incidence of diabetes and its complications, as well as high blood pressure, heart disease and kidney disease.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-12-19/mosquito-coils-do-they-work-are-they-bad-for-your-health/9268492

The burning of aromatic plant material to keep away swarms of mosquitoes is an integral part of many cultural traditions around the world. But it wasn’t until the early nineteen hundreds the distinctively shaped mosquito coil was born. Mosquito coils contain a mix of substances. Along with the products that deter mosquito biting, there are also products that hold the coil together and enable it to smoulder slowly.
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Malaria is the worst of illnesses with recent reports from the World Health Organisation suggesting the steady improvements in the burden of disease are slowing, and may even be getting worse. Dengue continues to have wide ranging impacts. Australia has also seen record-breaking epidemics of Ross River virus disease in recent years. A review of fifteen previously published studies showed there’s no evidence burning insecticide-containing mosquito coils prevented malaria.
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In Australia, all products that purport to kill mosquitoes must be registered by the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority. Check the packaging for a registration number. There are dozens of different variations on “mosquito coils” including sticks, coils, candles and a variety of “smokeless” plug in devices. Fortunately, some of the more dangerous chemicals found in mosquito coils are not used in products produced and sold locally in Australia.

.Recently consumer products have been made available in Australia that contain the insecticide Metofluthrin, an insecticide shown to hold great potential for managing mosquito-borne disease.  Products of this nature are better suited to indoor use than mosquito coils so may be important in controlling outbreaks of disease.

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