The Health News – 14 June 2017

Overview:

• Bank of America Merrill Lynch vice-chairman and Western Sydney Local Health chair Richard Alcock was named an Officer in the Order of Australia today for his distinguished service to the community through health management roles, and to higher education and the law through corporate governance.

• The Therapeutic Drugs Administration has issued its second recall of diazepam tablets, or Valium, in two weeks, following a discovery of suspected tampering. Pharmacists across the country have been asked to check all packages of Valium they dispense, and patients who suspect their pack may have been tampered with are asked to return the packages to their pharmacy for a full refund.

• An inquest into the death of teenager Ahlia Raftery in Mater Mental Health Centre in March 2015 has led to recommendations to improve patient care and help prevent future tragedies. Deputy state coroner Derek Lee has made seven recommendations to the Hunter New England Health District to improve policies, nurse training, record keeping and communication between staff.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  14th of June 2017. Read by Wayne Bucklar. Health News

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/in-depth/queens-birthday-honours/queens-birthday-honours-2017-passionate-public-health-advocate/news-story/475a90fb925d2012017382727d82084e

The Australian reports that

Bank of America Merrill Lynch vice-chairman and Western Sydney Local Health chair Richard Alcock … was named an Officer in the Order of Australia today for his distinguished service to the community through health management roles, and to higher education and the law through corporate governance.

A former senior partner at Allens Arthur Robinson, Alcock is a director of the University of New South Wales Foundation and former deputy chair of the Sydney Children’s Hospital network. He is currently chairman of the Western Sydney Local Health District, and until last year a Council Member of Knox Grammar.

He has worked with Bank of America Merrill Lynch’s investment banking division since 2007.

Alcock told The Australian: “Our public health system provides universal access to very high quality care delivered by dedicated and highly skilled clinicians.

Alcock believes research is central to solving one of the “grand challenges” of healthcare: how to continue to develop new treatments ‎and make them affordable and universally accessible.

“We are seeing the emergence of a multidisciplinary approach to delivering better healthcare — clinicians and health professionals working with data analysts,” Alcock said.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-06-10/valium-recall-affects-valpam-5/8606646

There has been a  second recall of  Valium, in two weeks, following a discovery of suspected tampering.

Drug manufacturer Arrow Pharma is recalling all batches of Valpam 5 tablets supplied in blister packs of fifty as some packs have been found to contain sleeves of substitute drugs.

Manufacturer Roche was forced to recall all packs of fifty Valium five milligram tablets two weeks ago after packets were found to have contained different drugs.

Deputy secretary at the Commonwealth Health Department, John Skerrit, said there were similarities between the two cases.

While the two cases involve different manufacturers, police are now investigating if a distribution centre is to blame.

Pharmacists across the country have been asked to check all packages of Valium they dispense, and patients who suspect their pack may have been tampered with are asked to return the packages to their pharmacy for a full refund.

The distribution centres involved have increased their scrutiny on staff and their scrutiny on packages of medicines.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-06-09/inquest-findings-into-ahlia-raftery-death/8606072

An inquest into the death of teenager Ahlia Raftery in a Newcastle mental health unit in March 2015 has led to recommendations to improve patient care and help prevent future tragedies.

Miss Raftery had only just turned eighteen when she took her own life in the Mater Mental Health Centre’s intensive care unit during a deep depressive episode.

The coronial inquest into her death has identified a number of specific shortcomings in Ms Raftery’s care and “areas which suggest that there is scope for improvement in general mental health care”.

Deputy state coroner Derek Lee has made seven recommendations to the Hunter New England Health District to improve policies, nurse training, record keeping and communication between staff.

The inquest heard Miss Raftery had been moved between four different wards over the five days leading up to her suicide.

The shortest time she spent in one ward was five point five hours.

It has led to a recommendation that patients not be transferred between mental health services without the agreement of their consulting psychiatrist.

Mister Lee has recommended New South Wales Health Minister Brad Hazzard consider increasing the nurse-to-patient ratios at the intensive care unit to ensure patient safety is not compromised.

It is also recommended that nurses be trained to complete patient observation charts accurately.

Mister Lee also wants to see a trial of the “back-to-base pulse oximetry units” which monitor blood oxygen saturation and can alert medical staff to a suicide attempt.

 

Liked it? Take a second to support healthprofessionalradio on Patreon!