The Health News Australia November 27 2017

  • A group of Australia’s most senior doctors, psychiatrists and surgeons have written an open letter to the Federal Government offering to fly to Manus Island and treat asylum seekers and refugees for free. The group say they are “deeply concerned” about the men’s physical and mental health. The 18 clinicians include leading psychiatrist and former Australian of the Year Professor Patrick McGorry, editor of the Medical Journal of Australia Professor Nick Talley, and the president of the College of GPs , Professor Bastian Seidel.
  • Disability advocacy groups facing huge cuts in New South Wales say the state government is continuing to deflect responsibility for their funding, despite a productivity commission finding to the contrary.  IDEAS, an information and advocacy service for people with a disability, is warning it may be forced to close its doors if the planned withdrawal of NSW funding goes ahead.
  • According to a new report, Australia is one of the fattest countries in the world and two in three Australians are now overweight or obese.  It shows our obsession with food has ranked us as the 5th most overweight and obese nation among all OECD countries. According to the AIHW findings that more than 11.2 eleven point two million adults (63%) and 1.2 million children (26%) have a BMI 25 or higher.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 27th of November 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-11-27/manus-island-asylum-seekers-offered-free-medical-treatment/9195126

A group of Australia’s most senior doctors, psychiatrists and surgeons have written an open letter to the Federal Government offering to fly to Manus Island and treat asylum seekers and refugees for free. The group say they are “deeply concerned” about the men’s physical and mental health. The eighteen clinicians include leading psychiatrist and former Australian of the Year Professor Patrick McGorry, editor of the Medical Journal of Australia Professor Nick Talley, and the president of the College of General Practitioners, Professor Bastian Seidel.

The group is calling on the Australian Government to facilitate diplomatic permission for their visit and to agree to allow them to treat the asylum seekers. Professor McGorry said he was concerned many of asylum seekers may not have access to their medications.

The leading doctors said recent events may have worsened the former detainees’ health. Papua New Guinea authorities moved all remaining three hundred twenty eight men at the decommissioned Manus Island detention centre to new camps, after police and immigration officials re-entered the site. The United Nations’ refugee agency said it had received reports several men had been severely injured and medical treatment was paramount.

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2017/nov/27/disability-advocacy-groups-warn-funding-withdrawl-may-force-them-to-close

Disability advocacy groups facing huge cuts in New South Wales say the state government is continuing to deflect responsibility for their funding, despite a productivity commission finding to the contrary. IDEAS, an information and advocacy service for people with a disability, is warning it may be forced to close its doors if the planned withdrawal of New South Wales funding goes ahead.

The NSW government is putting the responsibility for disability advocacy with the National Disability Insurance Scheme or NDIS. The NDIS, designed to empower people with a disability, is leading to a loss of funding for groups that provide crucial information and assistance, and advocate on their behalf. The funding reduction also comes at a pivotal period of disruption in the disability sector, when information and support are most needed. The Productivity Commission last month recommended state governments maintain their funding to advocacy groups.

But the IDEAS chief executive, Diana Palmer, said the commission’s recommendation was being ignored by the state government. Palmer said she met with the NSW disability minister, Ray Williams, after the commission’s report, but he still has not changed his stance.

About ninety five percent of IDEAS’ funding comes from the state government. IDEAS is one of fifty groups in NSW alone threatened by the move to the NDIS.  The loss of the advocacy groups is expected to leave significant gaps in representation for people with a disability.

http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/health/health-problems/obesity-doubles-in-a-decade-and-twothirds-of-us-are-fat-report-claims/news-story/e6573d6cde9d8435577a5b6c8646b428

According to a new report, Australia is one of the fattest countries in the world and two in three Australians are now overweight or obese.  It shows our obsession with food has ranked us as the fifth most overweight and obese nation among all Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries. According to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare findings, more than eleven point two million adults or sixty three per cent and one point two million children or twenty six per cent have a body mass index twenty five or higher.

The report also shows stark differences between regional and metropolitan Australia. People from lower income backgrounds and those living in regional areas were more likely to be overweight and obese. This divide can also be seen with younger generations. More than one-third or thirty six per cent of children aged between two and seventeen in outer regional areas were overweight or obese compared to twenty two per cent in inner regional areas and twenty five per cent in major cities.

According to the findings, of the top ten fattest regions in Australia, nine are regional.

Regions of Australia with the highest rates of overweight and obese adults.

Number one: Country South Australia, where a whopping seventy three point three per cent of adults are classed as overweight; Two: Darling Downs and West Moreton, Queensland at seventy point one per cent; Three: Western Victoria at seventy point one per cent; Four: South-eastern New South Wales at sixty nine point one per cent; Five: Hunter New England and Central Coast at sixty eight point four per cent; Six: Murray, Victoria/New South Wales at sixty eight point two per cent; Seven: Tasmania at sixty seven point five  per cent; Eight: Central Queensland, Wide Bay and Sunshine Coast at sixty eight point four per cent; Nine: Nepean Blue Mountains at sixty six point nine per cent; Ten: Country Western Australia at sixty five point nine per cent.

This was backed up by a recent University of Sydney study. It shows young people gain more weight each year than older people. Professor Alison Hayes from the university’s School of Public Health said: “Contrary to popular belief, it’s not in middle age that people suddenly pile on the pounds.  In fact, at a population level, young people gain more weight each year than older people.”

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