The Health News Australia July 21 2017

Overview

  • Fatalities from food-induced allergic reactions in Australia have been increasing by around 10% each year. As the number of Australians with severe food allergies rises, so too has the number of restaurant diners suffering food-induced anaphylaxis. To combat the problem a new online training course for hospitality workers was launched today by Sydney chef Alex Herbert, the website is foodallergytraining.org.au.
  • Australia is contributing funds to help Sri Lanka combat its worst outbreak of dengue fever, which has claimed 250 lives and infected nearly 100,000 people so far this year in the Indian Ocean island nation. Australia is giving $ 475,000 Australian dollars to the World Health Organization to implement immediate dengue prevention, management and eradication programs in Sri Lanka.
  • Doug Young was diagnosed with dementia in 2011 and has became one of more than  410,000 Australians with the disease, which has become the country’s second leading cause of death. The Lancet recommendations for improving brain health and minimising the risk of dementia are: increasing education (past the age of 15), physical activity and social engagement while reducing smoking and obesity, treating blood pressure, depression, diabetes, and hearing impairment.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 21st of July 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

http:www.abc.net.aunews2017-07-19training-hospitality-workers-to-understand-allergies8724098

As the number of Australians with severe food allergies rises,  so too has the number of restaurant diners suffering food-induced anaphylaxis.

Fatalities from food-induced allergic reactions in Australia have been increasing by around ten percent each year.  To combat the problem a new online training course for hospitality workers was launched today by Sydney chef Alex Herbert.  The website aims to offer hospitality workers free online allergy training.  Miss Herbert said cutting out cross contamination was key to lessening the number of allergic reactions,  and the only way for that to happen was if chefs learnt to be aware of how they were preparing their food.

Miss Herbert said her son had severe allergies and anaphylaxis was not just frightening for the sufferer,  but also for those who might have inadvertently fed them the wrong food.  

“It is terrifying for people around, because there is a sense of helplessness,” she said.

“But also there’s a sense of what could we have done better, and with then with that comes a feeling of guilt.”  Allergy specialist Associate Professor Richard Loh said hospital admissions for the most severe form of food allergic reaction, anaphylaxis, have gone up five-fold over the last twenty years.  He said the launch of the new website was an important step.

Professor Loh said that this is the first in the world where you’ve got a free, online training module that has got the best information,  [and] it’s standardised … using evidence based material and anything we can do to help improve education  and awareness will reduce the risk to our patients who are at risk of allergic reactions.  Professor Loh also stated that in the end the best thing to learn was not how to use an EpiPen  — but to understand the importance of not giving an allergy sufferer the food they are allergic to.  “Prevention is much better than knowing how to treat anaphylaxis,” he said.

http:abcnews.go.comHealthwireStoryaustralia-sri-lanka-fight-worst-dengue-outbreak-487365

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Australia is contributing funds to help Sri Lanka combat its worst outbreak of dengue fever,   which has claimed two hundred fifty lives and infected nearly one hundred thousand people so far this year in the Indian Ocean island nation.  Visiting Foreign Minister Julie Bishop said Wednesday night that Australia is giving four hundred seventy five thousand Australian dollars to the World Health Organization  to implement immediate dengue prevention, management and eradication programs in Sri Lanka.  Sri Lanka’s hospitals are overcrowded with patients, and the government has deployed soldiers, police and health officials  to inspect houses and clear rotting garbage, stagnant water pools and other potential mosquito-breeding grounds across the country.  Health officials blamed the public for their failure to clear puddles and piles of trash after last month’s heavy monsoon rains.

The number of infections nationwide is already thirty eight percent higher than last year,  when fifty five thousand one hundred and fifty people were diagnosed with dengue and ninety seven died, according to the Health Ministry.  Cases were concentrated around the main city of Colombo, though they were occurring across the tropical island nation.

http:www.thesenior.com.auhealthit-shouldnt-be-happening-to-anyone-many-dementia-cases-can-be-prevented

Doug Young loved cars, so much so that he spent his weekends restoring them.  Fixing up a car might take Doug a couple of weekends,  but he had been working on the latest car for several years without any progress.  He was also coming home with dings on the family car, unusual for a man who cared meticulously for his vehicles.

Then, in two thousand eleven, Doug was diagnosed with dementia.  He became one of more than four hundred ten thousand Australians with the disease,  which has become the country’s second leading cause of death.  At first, Doug’s decline was gradual and the typical “Aussie bloke” who was proud,  and used to doing things himself and caring for his family, became frustrated as he became less able.

Doug, seventy four, still remembers nursery rhymes which he sings with his son’s Nick’s four-year-old daughter Isabelle.  “Otherwise there’s no awareness of where he is or recollection of his family,” his son Nick says.

The Lancet recommendations for improving brain health and minimising the risk of dementia are: increasing education (past the age of fifteen),  physical activity and social engagement while reducing smoking and obesity, treating blood pressure, depression, diabetes, and hearing impairment.  Until a cure is found for dementia, Nick Young wants to raise awareness and money for Alzheimer’s Australia.

Dementia is characterised by a decline in cognitive level that affects activities of daily living or social functioning. It affects about  forty seven million people worldwide and this number is projected to triple by two thousand and fifty. Dementia is usually preceded by mild cognitive (where complex tasks can still be completed) impairment and the boundary between the two is grey. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common type of dementia, but there are many different kinds. Healthier lifestyles are associated with declining prevalence of cognitive impairment and dementia. While there is no cure, there is “good potential for prevention”.

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