The Health News United Kingdom April 19 2018

  • Families of children with ADHA are warning that too often medication is the only option they are offered to manage the condition. A survey of parents across Scotland found evidence of delays in diagnosing ADHD and inadequate support afterwards.The Scottish ADHD Coalition also uncovered concerns about inadequate training of school staff. The Scottish government said medication was offered in accordance with good clinical practice.It added that it was often accompanied by non-drug treatments such as counselling.
  • The UK is stepping up efforts to help eliminate trachoma, a painful bacterial infection that can lead to permanent loss of sight among some of the poorest people in the world. At this week’s Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in London the UK’s international development secretary, Penny Mordaunt, has pledged an extra £20 million to provide sight-saving antibiotics and surgery to people in 10 Commonwealth countries.
  • With around 62% of UK adults and 30% of children either overweight or obese, they are facing an imminent, devastating public health crisis that requires government action. Weight related, chronic health conditions – including Type 2 diabetes – continue to rise at alarming levels, placing significant strain on the health service and taking a serious toll on the health of the nation overall.  Childhood obesity, in particular, is an epidemic that requires decisive national action from government.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 19th of April 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-43781070

Families of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder are warning that too often medication is the only option they are offered to manage the condition. A survey of parents across Scotland found evidence of delays in diagnosing ADHD and inadequate support afterwards.The Scottish ADHD Coalition also uncovered concerns about inadequate training of school staff. The Scottish government said medication was offered in accordance with good clinical practice. It added that it was often accompanied by non-drug treatments such as counselling.

About five percent of schoolchildren have ADHD, a neurodevelopmental condition which causes hyperactivity, impulsiveness and inattention. However, only one percent or nine thousand children are known to have the condition north of the border. The Scottish ADHD Coalition believes it is under-diagnosed in many areas. And in its latest report on ADHD services in Scotland, it raises concerns of an over-reliance on medication in treating the condition.
In a survey of more than two hundred parents, ninety three percent said their child had been prescribed medication for their condition and it was helpful.

But in many cases it was the only treatment offered. The survey also found that almost two third (sixty three percent) of parents were offered no training to help them manage their child’s condition. Almost half (forty one percent) were given no written information about ADHD. Around fifteen percent said they had received psychological input. Problems in school were also highlighted in the report, which revealed that only a quarter of parents (twenty six percent) believed their child’s teachers had a good understanding of ADHD.
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Mental Health Minister Maureen Watt said: “That is why we have doubled the number of child and adolescent mental health service psychology posts in recent years, and we’re investing an extra one hundred fifty million pounds in mental health over five years.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/0/uk-leads-fight-eliminate-blindness/

The UK is stepping up efforts to help eliminate trachoma, a painful bacterial infection that can lead to permanent loss of sight among some of the poorest people in the world. At this week’s Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in London the UK’s international development secretary, Penny Mordaunt, has pledged an extra twenty million pounds to provide sight-saving antibiotics and surgery to people in ten Commonwealth countries.

Trachoma, the leading infectious cause of blindness in the world, is an incredibly painful condition which can lead to permanent loss of sight. Less serious cases can be treated with antibiotics, while more severe cases require surgery. The World Health Organization is aiming for the disease to be wiped out around the world by two thousand twenty.

The UK funding will be used to help health authorities in Tanzania, Nigeria, Pakistan and Kenya to track down the last cases of the disease. It will also enable seventy six thousand sufferers of the disease in Kenya to have sight-saving surgery. The money comes on top of a £360m pledge the UK government made last April to wipe out the world’s forgotten tropical diseases, such as trachoma, sleeping sickness and leprosy.

Miss Mordaunt said: “UK aid has already made a huge difference to vulnerable people in countries including Malawi, Mozambique and Uganda, freeing families trapped in a cycle of poverty as the disease passes from one generation to the next. In Malawi for example, four years ago eight million people were at risk of trachoma and now no-one is.”

https://www.politicshome.com/news/uk/health-and-care/illnesstreatments/opinion/diabetes-uk/94438/childhood-obesity-epidemic

With around sixty two percent of UK adults and thirty percent of children either overweight or obese, they are facing an imminent, devastating public health crisis that requires government action. Weight related, chronic health conditions – including Type two diabetes – continue to rise at alarming levels, placing significant strain on the health service and taking a serious toll on the health of the nation overall.  Childhood obesity, in particular, is an epidemic that requires decisive national action from government.

One clear way government can do this is by committing to introduce, as the UK left the European Union, mandatory front of pack traffic light labelling on all food and drink packaging across the UK, and by introducing mandatory calorie labelling on menus in large-medium sized restaurants, cafes and takeaways.   Evidence shows that clear food labels help people make better choices and give us more control over the food and drink people buy and consume; independent evidence from the Food Standards Agency shows that the traffic-light system works better than other labels to help shoppers make healthy choices when buying food. A Cochrane Review also found that calorie labelling on menus in restaurants and cafes could help people to reduce the number of calories they consume.
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Polling carried out by Diabetes UK, as part of the Food Upfront food labelling campaign, shows that while only three in ten people (twenty nine percent) felt they had enough information about what’s in their food, nine out of ten people said traffic-light food labelling helped them make healthier decisions. More than three quarters of people (seventy six percent) said that cafes, restaurants and takeaways should display calorie information on their menus, so that customers understand the content of the food and drink they buy. Despite this, food labelling is not compulsory. One in three food products don’t have front-of-pack labels at all and many restaurants, cafes and takeaways still do not provide calorie labelling.

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