The Health News Australia November 30 2017

  • South Australia’s emergency department (ED) wait times continue to lag behind the national average, despite the State Government’s major overhaul of the health system.
    A report by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW), entitled Emergency department care 2016/2017: Australian hospital statistic, has found 73% of people who presented to the nation’s emergency departments were seen “on time” last financial year.
  • As the ADHA endeavours to improve the usefulness of its My Health Record, a flurry of announcements has celebrated the signing of agreements with pathology laboratories, pharmacy groups and diagnostic imaging practices for the sharing of clinical records. Following recent criticism of the incomplete information contained within My Health Record and the impact on its clinical value, the ADHA’s efforts to populate the national repository of Australians’ health information with clinically relevant documents have kicked into gear.
  • Researchers may have found a new drug target for endometrial cancer, after the discovery of a protein released by fat cells that drives growth of the disease. Australian researchers have for the first time uncovered a reason to explain why there is a strong link between obese women and endometrial cancer. A study at the University of Newcastle’s Hunter Medical Research Institute has identified a protein called VEGF  that drives the growth of the cancer cells.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 30th of November 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-11-29/sa-hospital-waiting-times-worsen-despite-health-overhaul/9203834

South Australia’s emergency department wait times continue to lag behind the national average, despite the State Government’s major overhaul of the health system.
A report by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW), entitled Emergency department care two thousand sixteen and two thousand seventeen: Australian hospital statistic, has found seventy three per cent of people who presented to the nation’s emergency departments were seen “on time” last financial year. The meaning of “on time” depends on the individual case, and what is deemed as “clinically appropriate” in the circumstances.
AIHW senior executive Jenny Hargreaves said while national wait times had remained steady over the past five years, it was a different story in South Australia. She said:  “In two thousand twelve and two thousand thirteen, seventy five per cent of patients were seen on time in South Australia hospitals and in the latest year it was sixty four per cent.”

Over a five-year period, the proportion of people seen on time increased in New South Wales, stayed about the same in Victoria, went down a small proportion in Queensland, Western Australia and Tasmania, and increased in the Australian Capital Territory and in the Northern Territory. South Australia’s Auditor-General last month found Transforming Health had not achieved its savings targets and had actually cost the Government money over the past financial year. The policy was announced in two thousand fourteen as a way of getting the state’s burgeoning health budget under control and making the system more efficient.
The  two thousand sixteen and two thousand seventeen AIHW report also found that the average length of an emergency department wait had increased in South Australia by sixteen minutes in five years.

http://www.healthcareit.com.au/article/concern-grows-about-opt-out-function-healthcare-industries-sign-connect-my-health-record

As the Australian Digital Health Agency endeavours to improve the usefulness of its My Health Record, a flurry of announcements has celebrated the signing of agreements with pathology laboratories, pharmacy groups and diagnostic imaging practices for the sharing of clinical records. Following recent criticism of the incomplete information contained within My Health Record and the impact on its clinical value, the ADHA’s efforts to populate the national repository of Australians’ health information with clinically relevant documents have kicked into gear.

But the uploading of people’s most private and consequential personal information onto a Federal Government server is causing concern for the lack of a true opt-out function and little communication with the public.

According to the Australian Privacy Foundation’s Doctor Bernard Robertson-Dunn, the Federal Government is attempting to “quietly force” the system on as many Australians as possible.
….
Concern centres on the moves by the ADHA to create a My Health Record for every Australian by the end of two thousand eighteen. The agency claims people can choose to opt-out, but the My Health Record website states uploaded documents remain online. Within its announcements over the last week, the ADHA has claimed that by the end of  two thousand eighteen over ninety five per cent of diagnostic imaging practices will be able to upload patient reports to the My Health Record system, with software companies in talks to build connectivity into their systems.

More than five point three million people have a My Health Record, with a new one created every thirty eight seconds.

https://healthtimes.com.au/hub/oncology/4/news/aap/researchers-may-have-found-a-new-drug-target-for-endometrial-cancer/3042/

Researchers may have found a new drug target for endometrial cancer, after the discovery of a protein released by fat cells that drives growth of the disease. Australian researchers have for the first time uncovered a reason to explain why there is a strong link between obese women and endometrial cancer. A study at the University of Newcastle’s Hunter Medical Research Institute has identified a protein called VEGF that drives the growth of the cancer cells.

Current statistics show that fifty seven per cent of women who develop endometrial cancer are obese, yet the mechanism for this strong association has been unclear. To investigate the impact excess weight has on the development of endometrial cancer, researchers gathered fat tissue samples from weight-loss surgery patients and added those cells to tumour cells.
The study, published in the journal Molecular Cancer Research, found increased fat levels had a direct correlation with elevated VEGF protein expression.

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