The Health News USA July 20 2017

Overview

  • The Cleveland Clinic says a 21-year-old woman disfigured by a gunshot as a teenager has received a face transplant. The hospital says the 31-hour surgery in May was its third face transplant and its first “total face transplant.” It included her scalp, eyelids, nose, facial muscles and nerves, teeth and much of her jaw. The medical center isn’t sharing names and other details about the patient and donor to protect their privacy.
  • The box prescription drugs had been forgotten in a back closet of a retail pharmacy for so long that some of the pills predated the 1969 moon landing. Most were 30 to 40 years past their expiration dates — possibly toxic, probably worthless. ProPublica has been researching why the U.S. healthcare system is the most expensive in the world. One answer, broadly, is waste — some of it buried in practices that the medical establishment and the rest of us take for granted.
  • There are 3.3 million people in the US who had diabetes in 2015. That means 9.4 percent of the  U.S. population that has diabetes.  That’s 1 in 10 people. The number of newly diagnosed cases of diabetes among U.S. adults in 2015  was 1.5 million. The number of newly diagnosed cases of diabetes among U.S. adults in 2015. That works out to 6.7 new cases per 1,000 people.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 20th of July 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

https:www.usnews.comnewsnewsarticles2017-07-18woman-disfigured-by-gunshot-gets-full-face-transplant

The Cleveland Clinic says a twenty one -year-old woman disfigured by a gunshot as a teenager has received a face transplant.  The hospital says the thirty one-hour surgery in May was its third face transplant and its first “total face transplant.”  It included her scalp, eyelids, nose, facial muscles and nerves, teeth and much of her jaw.  The medical center is not sharing names and other details about the patient and donor to protect their privacy.

A hospital statement on Tuesday quoted the recipient as saying recovery has sometimes been difficult  but she’s thankful for the medical staff and the “incredible gift” from the donor and the donor’s family.  Doctors say the transplant will help the woman breathe, speak, chew and express emotions more effectively.  They say facial reconstruction alone wouldn’t have accomplished that.

http:www.cnbc.com20170718the-myth-of-drug-expiration-dates.html

The box prescription drugs had been forgotten in a back closet of a retail pharmacy for so long that some of the pills predated the nineteen sixty nine moon landing.  Most were thirty to forty years past their expiration dates — possibly toxic, probably worthless.

But to Lee Cantrell, who helps run the California Poison Control System, the cache was an opportunity to answer an enduring question about the actual shelf life of drugs:  Could these drugs from the bell-bottom era still be potent?  Cantrell called Roy Gerona, a University of California, San Francisco, researcher who specializes in analyzing chemicals.  Gerona had grown up in the Philippines and had seen people recover from sickness by taking expired drugs with no apparent ill effects.  “This was very cool,” Gerona says. “Who gets the chance of analyzing drugs that have been in storage for more than thirty years?”

The age of the drugs might have been bizarre, but the question the researchers wanted to answer wasn’t.  Pharmacies across the country — in major medical centers and in neighborhood strip malls —  routinely toss out tons of scarce and potentially valuable prescription drugs when they hit their expiration dates.

Gerona and Cantrell, a pharmacist and toxicologist, knew that the term “expiration date” was a misnomer.  The dates on drug labels are simply the point up to which the Food and Drug Administration and pharmaceutical companies guarantee their effectiveness, typically at two or three years.  But the dates don’t necessarily mean they’re ineffective immediately after they “expire” — just that there’s no incentive for drugmakers to study whether they could still be usable.

ProPublica has been researching why the U.S. healthcare system is the most expensive in the world.  One answer, broadly, is waste — some of it buried in practices that the medical establishment and the rest of us take for granted.  We’ve documented how hospitals often discard pricey new supplies, how nursing homes trash valuable medications after patients pass away or move out, and how drug companies create expensive combinations of cheap drugs.

Experts estimate such squandering eats up about seven hundred sixty five billion a year as much as a quarter of all the country’s health care spending.

http:www.latimes.comsciencesciencenowla-sci-sn-diabetes-in-america-20170718-htmlstory.html

Baseball, hot dogs, apple pie and … diabetes.

That’s right. The metabolic condition is about as American as you can get,  according to a new national report card on diabetes released Tuesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  The report shows that nearly half of Americans have diabetes or prediabetes, which puts them at high risk for the condition.  A good number of these folks haven’t been diagnosed and don’t even realize their predicament.

People with diabetes have too much sugar in their blood.  If the disease isn’t controlled, they can wind up with heart disease, nerve damage, kidney problems, eye damage and other serious health problems.  The new report combines data from the CDC, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the Indian Health Service and the Census Bureau.  Here’s a numerical look at what they reveal about diabetes in America.

There are thirty point three million people in the US who had diabetes in two thousand and fifteen.  That means nine point four percent of the  U.S. population that has diabetes.  That’s one in ten people.  The number of newly diagnosed cases of diabetes among U.S. adults in two thousand and fifteen was one point five million.  That works out to six point seven new cases per one thousand people.

Where diabetes ranked seventh on the list of leading causes of death in the U.S. in two thousand and fifteen.  Diabetes was listed as a cause of death on two hundred fifty two thousand eight hundred and six death certificates that year,  including  seventy nine thousand five hundred and thirty five that identified diabetes as the primary cause of death.

 

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