The Health News Australia August 30 2017

Overview

  • In Australia, there has been a huge growth in wellbeing programs in schools with 9 in 10 independents schools now offering a wellness service to students and public schools following suit.
  • Doctor Nick Fuller, an obesity researcher is calling for people to ditch fad diets for good as it’s actually making them fatter. Many fad diets are developed by celebrities or people who are unqualified to give advice.
  • According to a new poll, most Australian parents think the car is a great place for a family chat but 76 percent say their kids are usually on a mobile device when on the move.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 30th of August 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health New

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-08-27/school-system-turns-spotlight-on-wellbeing-mental-health/8846596

There has been a huge growth in wellbeing programs in schools in Australia, with nine in ten independent schools now offering a wellness service to students and public schools following suit. Only sixty two percent of girls in secondary school said they had a strong sense of wellbeing. More than than fifty five percent considered themselves anxious. In New South Wales, public schools now required to have a planned approach to wellbeing and mental health. The annual NAB Independent Schools Survey reveals the huge level of investment schools are making in supporting the mental health and overall wellbeing of their students, with programs ranging from mindfulness and meditation practices to the building of special buildings equipped with swimming pools, yoga studios and spaces of quiet reflection.  Boys had higher levels of wellbeing and lower levels of anxiety, and primary school students fared much better than older students. The head of Behavioural and Industry Economics at NAB, Dean Pearson, said schools had instituted a wide array of programs to respond to escalating anxiety among young people. An overwhelming majority of independent schools now have wellbeing programs in place, with schools creating new specialist positions such as Directors of Wellbeing, and employing wellbeing coaches to counsel children.

Almost all public schools have wellbeing programs in place as well. All NSW public schools are required to have a planned approach to wellbeing, according to the NSW Education Department, and one hundred sixty seven point two million dollars was earmarked over four years for wellbeing packages for schools.

http://www.9news.com.au/national/2017/08/28/10/49/fad-diets-making-you-fatter-expert-claims

An obesity researcher is calling for people to ditch fad diets for good as it’s actually making them fatter. Doctor Nick Fuller says many of the diets are developed by celebrities or people who are unqualified to give advice. “They’re prescribing unrealistic, unhealthy and often dangerous weight loss diets which have a long-term detrimental effect,” said Doctor Fuller, who runs the clinical research program at the Boden Institute at the University of Sydney. He says fad dieting causes the body’s metabolism to drop and appetite hormones to rise. Doctor Fuller’s comments follow the launch of his new book “Interval Weight Loss” which was developed after helping thousands of patients in the public and private system to lose weight.Instead of restricting a person’s diet, it encourages a five meal plan that’s filled with nutritious food.

He says following the plan every second month allows the person to lose two to four kilograms each time.

Doctor Fuller said that interval weight loss will work one hundred percent of the time for anyone who is devoted to changing their lifestyle and following the interval weight loss plan and periods of weight loss followed by periods of weight maintenance. It effectively tricks the body into losing weight.

http://www.news.com.au/technology/gadgets/aussie-kids-are-glued-to-gadgets-like-mobiles-and-tablets-new-poll-reveals/news-story/99b6985c55ec431de338b5ba57d8738e

A new Galaxy poll has revealed that most Australian parents think the car is a great place for a family chat but seventy six percent say their kids are usually on a mobile device when on the move. Kids aged three to sixteen typically use digital media on car trips, parents said, with mobile phones, tablets, computer games and television the most popular activities.
The poll, commissioned by Ford Australia, surveyed more than one thousand two hundred people and it also revealed it’s not just the kids hitting their screens.

Adults said when the kids aren’t in the car the non-driver is most likely to be using a mobile device to make calls, check social media, send emails or play games. Psychologist and social commentator Sabina Read said it is worrying that people often seem more connected to a virtual world than their own families. She says that adults are behaving in the same way. We need to acknowledge our own behaviour as what we do, rather than what we say, speaks volumes.
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But it was concerning that twenty percent of parents thought it was acceptable for children aged between three and nine to have their own mobile device. On average, Australians think eleven is the right age for children to have their first mobile device. The Galaxy survey also found time in the car can spark kids’ imaginations and get them chatting.

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