The Health News USA October 26 2017

  • Tuesday marks Rotary International’s fifth annual World Polio Day, co-hosted by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and there is much cause for celebration: It is very possible that 2017 may see the end of the wild poliovirus — nearly two years earlier than Bill Gates predicted. Since the World Health Assembly’s 1988 launch of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative, the number of cases has been reduced by 99.9 percent, saving more than 13 million children from paralysis.
  • New York has added e-cigarettes to its indoor smoking ban, making it illegal to use the devices in bars, restaurants and most workplaces. While New York City and several other localities had already prohibited the use of e-cigarettes in areas covered by the smoking ban, the new statewide rules will provide consistency, according to Democratic Governor Andrew Cuomo, who signed the bill into law Monday.
  • New abortion regulations took effect on Tuesday in Missouri that critics argue will make it more difficult for women to access the procedure. A judge on Monday declined to block a requirement that physicians performing abortions inform their patients about abortion risks at least 72 hours before their procedure.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 26th of  October 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

https://www.cnbc.com/2017/10/24/bill-gates-humanity-will-see-its-last-case-of-polio-this-year.html

Tuesday marks Rotary International’s fifth annual World Polio Day, co-hosted by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and there is much cause for celebration: It is very possible that two thousand seventeen may see the end of the wild poliovirus — nearly two years earlier than Bill Gates predicted.

Doctor Jay Wenger, who leads the Gates Foundation’s polio eradication efforts said there are only twelve known cases of the wild poliovirus in existence today, in just two countries: Afghanistan and Pakistan. Although Doctor Jonas Salk is credited with developing the first safe and effective oral polio vaccine in nineteen fifty five, there were still about three hundred fifty thousand cases of polio worldwide thirty years later.  Doctor Wenger said: “In a lot of places, children don’t always get all the vaccines that they are supposed to, and that’s a chronic problem”. The virus can only live in people, he says, and it needs new people to infect to keep on spreading and keep on living. “If you make all those people in an area immune, then the virus can”t find new people to infect. So if we can get enough children in an area vaccinated, the virus dies off.”

Since the World Health Assembly’s ninety eighty eight nine launch of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative, the number of cases has been reduced by ninety nine point nine percent, saving more than thirteen million children from paralysis. Economic modeling has found that the eradication of polio would save at least forty billion dollars to fifty billion dollars between nineteen eighty eight and two thousand thirty five, mostly in low-income countries. Bill Gates is hopeful the disease will become the second disease after smallpox to disappear for good. “Progress in fighting polio might be one of the world’s best-kept secrets in global health,” he acknowledged in the foundation’s two thousand seventeen annual letter. But soon, he hopes, it will be a secret no more. “If things stay stable in the conflicted areas, humanity will see its last case of polio this year.

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/wireStory/gov-cuomo-signs-bill-banning-cigarettes-ny-workplaces-50687451

New York has added electronic cigarettes to its indoor smoking ban, making it illegal to use the devices in bars, restaurants and most workplaces. While New York City and several other localities had already prohibited the use of e-cigarettes in areas covered by the smoking ban, the new statewide rules will provide consistency, according to Democratic Governor Andrew Cuomo, who signed the bill into law Monday.
….
Several states including California, Connecticut and New Jersey have already added the devices to their smoking bans. New York’s new law will go into effect in thirty days. Earlier this year, Cuomo signed legislation to prohibit the use of electronic cigarettes in all public and private schools. The new law has the backing of the American Cancer Society and the American Lung Association. Jeff Seyler, executive vice president of the American Lung Association’s northeast region, said the new law sends a signal that e-cigarettes are not safe — and could help prevent some young people from getting hooked on nicotine. He added “E-cigarettes are proving to be just another tool reeling them into a dangerous and often lifetime of addiction to nicotine. “

Thomas Kiklas said he believes bans like New York’s may someday be rolled back once the public learns more about the devices. Kiklas is the co-owner of an e-cigarette brand and the co-founder of the Tobacco Vapor Electronic Cigarette Association. He said he has spoken to physicians who encourage smokers to switch to the products to reduce their risk of illness.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-missouri-abortion/stricter-missouri-abortion-rules-take-effect-after-legal-fight-idUSKBN1CT32G

New abortion regulations took effect on Tuesday in Missouri that critics argue will make it more difficult for women to access the procedure. A judge on Monday declined to block a requirement that physicians performing abortions inform their patients about abortion risks at least seventy two hours before their procedure. Previously, a different provider could give that mandated information.

That means repeat doctor visits for women seeking abortions, some of whom must travel hundreds of miles to reach one of Missouri’s three clinics, said Bonyen Lee-Gilmore, a spokeswoman for Planned Parenthood Great Plains. She added that there is also a shortage of abortion doctors.  The organization had sued to stop the new regulations because of the provider requirement.
….
Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley praised the law in a statement issued late on Monday, saying, “SB five enacts sensible regulations that protect the health of women in Missouri and we will continue to vigorously defend these.” The provider restriction was part of broader abortion regulations that went into effect on Monday after they were passed by Missouri lawmakers during a July special session called by Republican Governor Eric Greitens. Among other things, the law gives the attorney general power to enforce abortion laws, requires annual surprise inspections of clinics and exempts pregnancy resource centers, which counsel against abortions, from a local Saint Louis law banning employers from discriminating against those who have had an abortion. Critics of the St. Louis ordinance believed it could require the centers to hire workers who favor abortion rights.

….
According to the Guttmacher Institute, U.S. state legislatures enacted forty one new abortion restrictions in the first half of two thousand seventeen.

0 Comments

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.