The Health News Australia October 25 2017

  • The nation’s health system would be “rebooted” to put patients at the centre of healthcare and deliver Australia a $200 billion economic boost under a plan to be revealed today. While Australia has one of the highest life expectancy rates in the world, Australians are also among the sickest. If they were healthier, with lower rates of disease such as obesity, the average Australian would enjoy 2.6 years of improved life.
  • New figures show the companies spent more than $2 million on consultant fees, educational events like overseas conferences and guest speaking roles for allied health professionals in Australia in 2016-2017.
  • An image and health-obsessed Melbourne has provided a jobs boom for fitness instructors and beauty therapists. It shows across the country the number of people working as beauty therapists and fitness instructors has surged by more than 25 per cent since 2011, driven by its two biggest cities Melbourne and Sydney, despite the country’s population climbing by less than 9 per cent.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 25th of  October 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

https://thewest.com.au/news/australia/aussies-to-get-new-lease-on-life-with-200b-health-care-system-reboot-ng-b88637594z

The nation’s health system would be “rebooted” to put patients at the centre of healthcare and deliver Australia a two hundred billion dollar economic boost under a plan to be revealed Monday.
The Productivity Commission, in a one thousand two hundred twenty two-page blueprint to set up the national economy for the next thirty years, will advocate huge changes to the education system, starting with better pay to lure highly trained teachers. But motorists in major cities would pay for when and how often they use the roads under a move the commission argues will boost the spending on highways. Treasurer Scott Morrison will unveil the report that was commissioned to look at areas holding back the national economy. A key area the commission believes is ripe for change is the health system. Advocating a “teamwork” approach to the treatment of patients, the commission argues Australia’s system has not kept up with technological change to the disadvantage of the sick.

While Australia has one of the highest life expectancy rates in the world, Australians are also among the sickest. If they were healthier, with lower rates of disease such as obesity, the average Australian would enjoy two point six years of improved life. The commission has found with better links between doctors, hospitals and specialists, with more focus on outcomes rather than ultimate treatment, the economy could be up to two hundred billion better off over the next two decades. Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull will argue getting the health system right would save money and give all Australians a new lease on life.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-10-24/big-pharma-paying-nurses-allied-health-professionals-millions/9077746

Nurses, dietitians, pharmacists and other allied health workers are getting millions of dollars in payments from big pharmaceutical companies for their services. New figures show the companies spent more than two million dollars on consultant fees, educational events like overseas conferences and guest speaking roles for allied health professionals in Australia in two thousand sixteen and two thousand seventeen. The information from a new database, compiled by the University of Sydney, shows nurses have been the biggest winners.

The companies gave more than one point seven million dollars in one thousand six hundred thirty five separate payments to nurses and nurse practitioners over a one-year period.
An analysis by the ABC showed the pharmaceutical industry also spent almost five hundred thousand dollars in more than four hundred payments to dietitians, pharmacists, psychologists, physiotherapists and podiatrists. Even smaller specialties like embryologists, exercise physiologists, optometrists and a social worker also received money.
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While it has long been known that doctors and specialists take money from the corporations, it is the first time it has been made clear allied health professionals are also receiving payments. Many of the drug companies paid allied health workers who specialised in conditions that aligned with their product range.

http://www.theherald.com.au/story/5007331/census-2016-melbournes-obsession-with-health-triggers-a-job-surge/?cs=7

An image and health-obsessed Melbourne has provided a jobs boom for fitness instructors and beauty therapists. That’s the verdict from the latest round of census figures, delivered on Monday four months after the first release in June. It shows across the country the number of people working as beauty therapists and fitness instructors has surged by more than twenty five per cent since two thousand eleven, driven by its two biggest cities Melbourne and Sydney, despite the country’s population climbing by less than nine percent.
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It’s not only the feel-good factor driving health employment. An ageing population has driven more people to work in a hospital than in any other place in Greater Melbourne. Almost four per cent, or eighty thousand people in Melbourne now work in a hospital, while three point four per cent do the same in Sydney. Melbourne’s love of food, coffee and bars is reflected in its employment figures. They are the city’s next-largest employer, making up two point five per cent of all workers, the same percentage that work in Sydney’s entire banking and finance industry.
Higher education and the boom in international students flocking into Melbourne has pushed the industry to become the city’s fifth-highest employer, making up one point eight per cent of all employees.
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Up to forty five point eight per cent of  people in Sydney work forty hours or more per week, forty three per cent do the same in Melbourne. The Australian Bureau of Statistics figures also show the push towards the service economy is in full swing, with the number of workers in the community and personal service sector up nineteen per cent since the last time they were tallied. One in every eight workers now make their money in healthcare and social assistance as nurses, counsellors and increasingly, care workers for older Australians.

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