The Health News United Kingdom July 21 2017

Overview

  • A study has found that the average adult spends 2 hours and 11 minutes every day feeling stressed – the equivalent of 5 and half years over the course of a lifetime. Researchers found heavy workloads, financial worries, health problems and family dramas means the average adult spends the equivalent of more than fifteen hours a week feeling under pressure. The study of 2,000 adults, found more than two thirds of the population (69% per cent) often struggle with the daily demands of modern life.
  • The number of foreign-born mothers having babies in England and Wales in 2016 reached 28 % – the highest level on record, official statistics show. This figure has increased every year since 1990.
  • The Mail Online reports that vitamin D will not protect your child from a cold: myth-busting study says ‘more isn’t always better’ to help toddlers stay healthy. The story is based on a study that looked at whether giving healthy young children high doses of vitamin D in the winter protects them from colds and flu better than the standard recommended lower dose.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 21st of July 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

http:www.mirror.co.uklifestylehealthaverage-adult-spends-five-half-10830505

The average adult spends two hours and eleven minutes every day feeling stressed   – the equivalent of five-and-a-half years over the course of a lifetime, a study has found.

Researchers found heavy workloads, financial worries, health problems and family dramas  means the average adult spends the equivalent of more than fifteen hours a week feeling under pressure.  But as well as going for a walk, having a glass of wine and watching a film to relieve stress, more than half turn to cleaning to calm them down.  And the relaxation kicks in after just thirteen minutes of tidying.  And six in ten of the two thousand adults polled by household cleaning experts Kärcher, claim that having a clean and tidy house instantly makes them feel calmer and less stressed.  More than three in ten Brits even clean as soon as they get home to unwind, with thirty four percent even admitting to cleaning things which didn’t need it just because they were feeling stressed.  Jack Sweeney, from Kärcher UK said: ‘’Our lives are becoming more stressful than ever before,  so it’s important to take some time to relax and calm down, particularly after a long day.’’

The study of two thousand adults found more than two thirds of the population or sixty nine per cent often struggle with the daily demands of modern life.  The tell-tale signs of stress, according to respondents polled by OnePoll.com  were found to be snapping more than usual at friends, family or colleagues, followed by general irritability and feelings of being overwhelmed.  It also emerged that the relationship between cleanliness and calmness often runs deeper with four in ten  saying that a dirty home was often the cause of their stress in the first place.  And over two thirds of Brits who clean their home say the feeling of productivity associated with it helps to alleviate their stress.

http:www.bbc.comnewshealth-40655563

The number of foreign-born mothers having babies in England and Wales in two thousand and sixteen reached twenty eight percent   – the highest level on record, official statistics show.

This figure has increased every year since nineteen ninety.  Data from the Office for National Statistics also shows more women in their forties are giving birth than women aged under twenty.  This is the second year in a row this has happened  – a pattern last recorded in nineteen forty seven.

The fertility rate for women aged forty and over has now trebled since nineteen ninety, to fifteen point nine babies born per one thousand women in that age group.  The rate at which women in their thirties are having babies has been on the rise since the nineteen eighties.

In contrast, among women under twenty and aged twenty to twenty four, fertility rates are now at their lowest level since nineteen thirty eight.

The proportion of all live births to mothers born outside the UK stood at eleven point six percent at the start of the nineteen nineties.

The ONS says one of the reasons for the increase since then is that fertility levels are generally higher among foreign-born women. The overall number of live births in England and Wales decreased slightly last year, to just under seven hundred thousand. The average age of mothers in two thousand and sixteen increased to thirty point four years, compared with thirty point three years in two thousand and fifteen.

http:www.nhs.uknews201707JulyPagesHigh-dose-vitamin-D-doesnt-prevent-colds-and-flu-in-kids.aspx

The Mail Online says that vitamin D will not protect your child from a cold: myth-busting study says ‘more isn’t always better’ to help toddlers stay healthy.  

The story is based on a study that looked at whether giving healthy young children high doses of vitamin D in the winter protects them from colds and flu better than the standard recommended lower dose.  It found children taking the high dose were just as likely to get ill as children taking the standard dose  – both groups got an average of about one case of cold or flu during the winter.  There was a reduction in flu cases with the high dose, but flu cases were uncommon and therefore the reduction was small, four fewer infections per one hundred children over the winter season.  Current UK advice is that children aged one to four years old should be given a daily supplement containing ten micrograms of vitamin D  – the same as the standard dose in this study.  Giving children the higher dose used in the study of fifty micrograms seems unlikely to offer much benefit for winter colds and flu if they’re generally healthy.

The vitamin D used in the study was provided for free by the manufacturer Ddrops.  

The study was published in the peer-reviewed Journal of the American Medical Association.  The Mail Online provides good coverage of this story, making it clear that the study is not challenging the usefulness of the recommended vitamin D dosage,  but saying more isn’t better for colds.  

The researchers enrolled seven hundred and three healthy children aged between one and five years old. They randomly assigned the children to receive either ten micrograms or fifty micrograms of vitamin D by mouth each day during winter.  They then compared how often the children got colds or flu over this time.

There was a reduction in flu with high-dose vitamin D, but the number of cases was very small, so this finding needs to be treated cautiously.  The researchers have called for this to be looked at in further studies to see if this finding can be confirmed.

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