The Health News Australia September 7 2017

Overview

  • Disability providers are warning they may be forced to shut down regional and remote services if the national disability insurance scheme’s pricing levels do not change. Currently, the prices a disability provider can charge for NDIS services are set by the national disability insurance agency and reviewed annually, to take into account changing costs, inflation, and wage growth.
  • The practice of free birthing is on the rise in Australia. Free birth is a practice that rejects all medical intervention, including the presence of midwives at births and usually spurns medical prenatal care, such as ultrasounds and tests.
  • By 2018, all Australians will have a My Health Record, and by 2022, all healthcare providers will be able to contribute to and use health information stored in My Health Record on behalf of their patients.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 7th of  September 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2017/sep/02/disability-service-providers-warn-ndis-pricing-could-force-them-to-shut-down

Disability providers are warning they may be forced to shut down regional and remote services if the pricing levels of the national disability insurance scheme do not change. Their fears have been echoed by National Disability Services, the peak body for non-government services, which says disability providers across the country are struggling to remain viable. Ken Baker, chief executive of the NDS, said two-thirds of disability service providers had reported to the commission that they were “very worried about their capacity to provide services at current National Disability Insurance Scheme prices”.
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Currently, the prices a disability provider can charge for NDIS services are set by the national disability insurance agency and reviewed annually, to take into account changing costs, inflation, and wage growth. To remain viable, services must find a way to operate within the confines of NDIS pricing. A loading bonus of twenty to twenty five percent is given to rural and remote services, but the sector says the definition of “regional and remote” is so narrow that it excludes large swathes of regional Australia. The Cerebral Palsy Alliance is one provider concerned about the future of some of its regional services. It operates fifty five sites across cities and in regional and rural New South Wales. Its chief executive, Rob White, said one of its sites already had to stop most of its therapy services. Baker said he held faith in the review process.

The NDIA spokesman said the number of registered NDIS service providers grew by twenty eight percent to eight thousand nine hundred sixty eight by the end of June. But Baker said fifty four percent of those providers were inactive.

http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/parenting/pregnancy/free-birthing-trend-on-the-rise-and-it-has-medical-experts-worried/news-story/b7e033d2415c6a28f4fb64fa5280d891

Free birth is a practice that rejects all medical intervention, including the presence of midwives at births and also usually rejects medical prenatal care, such as ultrasounds and tests. And they are worrying medical professionals because of the risk it puts both women and babies in. Doctor Michael Gannon, a practising obstetrician and president of the Australian Medical Association, doesn’t mince his words when he describes the free birth movement as a “whole different level of stupidity”. The free birth movement doesn’t have any midwives on site in the home. There are no statistics on how many babies are born via free birth; however, less than one per cent of women give birth at home, usually with a registered midwife. But thanks to social media and the internet, there is a flourishing community of free-birthers who share information and promote free-birthing to other women. For women who choose to give birth at home, many say they find the experience “empowering” and less stressful than being in hospital. In June, Adelaide woman Lisa Barrett was charged over the deaths of two babies born during home births. She is currently on bail and has been ordered not to attend or promote home births. Up until the mid-twentieth century, childbirth was an incredibly dangerous venture for women to undertake; since nineteen fifteen, survival rates have improved by more than ninety percent in first world countries.

http://www.zdnet.com/article/melbourne-health-seeks-network-provider-as-it-readies-electronic-record-system/

The Victorian government has gone to tender, seeking a provider to upgrade Melbourne Health’s network and site infrastructure. The successful vendor will be charged with enabling appropriate levels of clinical and administrative user access to a proposed electronic medical record system to be introduced at Melbourne Health, the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, and the Royal Women’s Hospital, the request for tender or RFT explains.

In South Australia, a new electronic records system being rolled out across public hospitals is possibly not fit for purpose, according to the Australian Medical Association, which last month said almost forty percent of the two hundred fifty staff members it spoke with held a “poor” opinion of the four hundred twenty two million dollar enterprise patient administration system. Thirty percent believed patients are not clinically safer, and twenty percent found it responsible for adverse patient outcomes. By two thousand eighteen, all Australians will have a My Health Record, and by two thousand twenty two, all healthcare providers will be able to contribute to and use health information stored in My Health Record on behalf of their patients.

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