The Health News United Kingdom December 15 2017

  • Members of Parliament say that The UK government could help save millions of lives across the world if it commits to a UN health strategy. The G20 Health and Development Partnership met in Parliament for the first time this week to agree its strategy to push global health up on the G20 agenda, and convince governments and treasuries around the world to make global health a core economic issue. The G20 – an international forum for global governments – believes the risks posed by HIV, malaria, TB and antibiotic resistance, emerging pandemics and neglected diseases will impact communities worldwide.
  • The Department of Health said the setting of public sector pay policy for 2017-2018 had cleared the way for the implementation of a 2017/18 Pay Award for over 55,000 health and social care workers in Northern Ireland. The 1% uplift was recommended earlier this year by the independent NHS Pay Review Body and the Review Body on Doctors’ and Dentists’ Remuneration.
  • The NHS needs almost 200,000 more staff to cope with rising pressures as “millennial” workers increasingly demand career breaks and part-time roles, a new ten year plan warns. The health service strategy, published today, suggests the workforce will need to grow by close to a fifth unless productivity of the service improves, or decisive action is taken to prevent ill-health.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 15th of December 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/government-could-help-save-97-million-lives-by-supporting-un-health-goals-mps-say_uk_5a315983e4b07ff75aff9a3c

Members of Parliament say that the UK government could help save millions of lives across the world if it commits to a United Nations health strategy. The G twenty Health and Development Partnership met in Parliament for the first time this week to agree its strategy to push global health up on the G twenty agenda, and convince governments and treasuries around the world to make global health a core economic issue.

Diplomats from Argentina, Germany, Italy, Indonesia, Brazil, Turkey and Japan met MPs, Foreign Office staff and Lords to assess how best to meet the UN’s target of saving up to ninety seven million lives in low and middle-income countries by generating new spending on global health challenges and pushing its agenda worldwide. Labour MP Stephen Twigg, chair of the international development select committee, said: “If the G twenty can agree to meet the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals, up to ninety seven million lives might be saved by tackling serious diseases.
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The G twenty – an international forum for global governments – believes the risks posed by HIV, malaria, tuberculosis and antibiotic resistance, emerging pandemics and neglected diseases will impact communities worldwide.

https://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/northern-ireland/northern-ireland-health-workers-to-get-1-pay-award-36405196.html

The Department of Health said the setting of public sector pay policy for two thousand seventeen and two thousand eighteen had cleared the way for the implementation of a two thousand seventeen – two thousand eighteen Pay Award for over fifty five thousand health and social care workers in Northern Ireland. The one percent uplift was recommended earlier this year by the independent NHS Pay Review Body and the Review Body on Doctors’ and Dentists’ Remuneration.

The Department said the pay policy, determined by the Department of Finance, along with the allocation of twenty six million pounds on November twenty nine, allows the Department of Health to implement the one percent pay award for health and social care workers. The Permanent Secretary of the Department of Health, Richard Pengelly said: “Our workers are our most valuable asset and they deserve to receive the hard-earned pay which is owed to them. I fully understand the frustrations and uncertainty about pay caused by the absence, until today, of a pay policy.”

The necessary arrangements to make the backdated pay award will be put in place as soon as possible, with full implementation expected before the end of the financial year.

Alliance health spokeswoman Paula Bradshaw said it was a small step in the right direction.
She said: “Now what is required is a Minister in place to consider how health workers are to be compensated for the rising cost of living, now we have seen a further rise in inflation.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/12/13/millenials-demanding-shorter-hours-gap-years-will-fuel-nhs-workforce/

The NHS needs almost two hundred thousand more staff to cope with rising pressures as “millennial” workers increasingly demand career breaks and part-time roles, a new ten year plan warns. The health service strategy suggests the workforce will need to grow by close to a fifth unless productivity of the service improves, or decisive action is taken to prevent ill-health. It says the NHS  needs to adapt, to take account of the rising number of health professionals choosing to work part-time, seeing flexible working and career breaks “as a right”.

Professor Ian Cumming, chief executive of Health Education England, said the attitudes of millennials – those born in the eighties and early nineties – were very different to previous generations, with a much bigger focus on “work/life balance”. And he said the increasing number of women entering traditionally male-dominated health professions such as medicine meant the NHS needed to train far more staff, to cover the numbers working part-time.
The ten-year-plan – the first such workforce strategy to be published for twenty five years – follows figures showing the average GP now works four days, down from four and a half days in two thousand nine.
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While the baby boomer generation are described as wanting to be recognised for their achievements, the millennial generation, now in its twenties and thirties, sees “work-life balance as paramount” and do not want to sacrifice their personal life for career success. The age group – also dubbed Generation Y – expect change and variety from employers, “like to be loved” and will seek employment elsewhere if their standards and needs are not met, the report on staff in the West Midlands found.

Women now outnumber men in medical school, while two thirds of GPs under the age of forty are female, and more likely to seek part-time roles, while bringing up children. Professor Cumming said other traditionally male NHS careers – such as that of paramedic – were now seeing rising numbers of women entering the profession, which would also mean extra numbers would need to enter training.

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