The Health News Australia October 14 2017

  • Australian schools are adopting GPS-based sports science technology currently used by professional athletes to increase students’ knowledge of their own performances and overall motivation for physical activity.
  • Only 53 per cent of Australians with disability are employed, compared to 83 per cent of all working-age people. Australia ranks 21st out of 29 Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development nations when it comes to employment rates for people with a disability.
  • The Federal Government’s Health Star Rating claims to “take some of the guess work out of shopping” and help consumers “make smarter choices” when it comes to buying food. The system is designed to give you an “at-a-glance overall health rating” of packaged and processed foods. Foods are rated from half-a-star to five stars, depending on their composition of “healthy nutrients” and “risk nutrients”.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 14th of  October 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

http://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/2017/10/11/aussie-schools-adopt-same-sports-technology-as-pro-athletes_a_23239427/?utm_hp_ref=au-health

Australian schools are adopting GPS-based sports science technology currently used by professional athletes to increase students’ knowledge of their own performances and overall motivation for physical activity. GameTraka, a wearable GPS unit designed by sporting software developer Sports Performance Tracking or SPT, is currently being used by more than thirty schools around the country as a learning tool for the classroom and allows for students to analyse their own workouts and performances. The unit pack — which comes with the GPS hardware, a torso vest and access to online SPT software — tracks the running distances, top speeds, heat maps and intensity of a person during a sporting match and allows them to analyse post-match data and compare it to other people, making it useful in custom designing training regimes and avoiding injury due to excessive fatigue.

You simply pop this device into your vest, play in a sporting match and the rest is done for you.
Swan Hill College, which is based just south of the Victoria-New South Wales border, is one of those schools currently using the technology to get students interested in their own physical activity. Whitney Kennedy, the head of the physical education and health department at Swan Hill, told HuffPost Australia the GameTraka device has seen a boost to students’ motivation towards sport and lets them compare their own exercise to the elite results of professional athletes. She said: “Students do like to compare their data to that of professional athletes so they can develop an appreciation for just how good some athletes are.”
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She also said that many of the students from the Swan Hill area “live and breathe their sport” and the device supports teachers to prepare students for their Victorian Certificate of Education  studies while also placing a focus on improving sporting results.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-10-12/disability-discrimination-in-the-workplace-in-three-charts/9038178

Only fifty three per ent of Australians with disability are employed, compared to eighty three per cent of all working-age people. Australia ranks twenty first out of twenty nine Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development nations when it comes to employment rates for people with a disability.

But looking at the data reveals an even darker story — complaints about disability discrimination are the largest category of discrimination reported to the Australian Human Rights Commission , and the numbers have been steady for around twenty years. Lower employment levels translate into Australians with disability living in poverty at the highest rates in the OECD.

The Australian Bureau of Statistics also found that the employment rates vary radically depending upon the “disability type”. Those who have a “psychological disability”, for example, have the lowest employment rate at twenty nine per cent. Employment also varies by “disability severity” (defined as mild, moderate, severe and profound). Employment decreases as severity increases. Only twenty six percent of people with profound or severe physical disability are employed.
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Some may argue that Australians with severe levels of disability would be unable to work. But their experiences show that, with the correct assistive technology and attitudes that focus on ability rather than disability, employment is not just possible but imperative. A recent OECD report singled out Denmark and Switzerland for their targeted intervention for younger people with disability or medical conditions. This ensures they have the highest chances of being employed rather than becoming welfare-dependent. The foundation of the National Disability Insurance Scheme shows the government’s desire to give people with disability the opportunity to move from welfare to employment. Organisations like the Australian Network on Disability can help businesses to become strategically more inclusive. In the end it will come down to employers giving every Australian job seeker with disability a fair go and not judging “what I can do by what you think I can’t”.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/health/2017-10-12/what-you-need-to-know-about-the-health-star-rating-on-foods/9040200

The Federal Government’s Health Star Rating claims to “take some of the guess work out of shopping” and help consumers “make smarter choices” when it comes to buying food.
Alexandra Jones from the George Institute for Global Health in Sydney told AM that the food industry is intentionally prolonging a review of the scheme’s rules. Miss Jones said “It’s a well known tactic of the food industry to ask for more evidence and consultation as a way of delaying meaningful public health policy. “The Health Star Rating Advisory Committee is meeting today in Melbourne to reconsider the scheme’s so-called “as prepared” rule. That’s a provision that allows companies to rate products based on their suggested recipe for preparation, rather than on their standalone nutritional value.

Nestle says it welcomes the “as prepared” rule review and it doesn’t have a view on whether it should change. Its industry body, the Australian Food and Grocery Council which is on the HSRAC, is more forthright. They don’t want a change. “Milo is intended to be consumed with skim milk and the company is following the direction of Food Standards Australian and New Zealand, and the regulations that require that nutrition labelling reflects the product as intended to be consumed,” said the council’s deputy chief executive Geoffrey Annison.

The system is designed to give you an “at-a-glance overall health rating” of packaged and processed foods. Foods are rated from half-a-star to five stars, depending on their composition of “healthy nutrients” and “risk nutrients”.  An analysis of more than thirty four thousand products by the George Institute found the rating system was “getting it pretty right on most products”.

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