The Health News United Kingdom October 15 2017

  • According to a BBC investigation, Great Ormond Street Hospital is not meeting care standards for intersex children. It found that some patients who had been born with sexual development disorders, and their families, had no access to psychological care. And not all cases were properly discussed before the patient had life changing, irreversible surgery. s.
  • General Practitioners should conduct appointments standing up in order to set a good example to patients, a conference of family doctors has heard. Medics are being urged to “practise what they preach” and use their personal behaviour to provoke discussion about the dangers of a sedentary lifestyle.
  • NHS leaders are urging nurses, doctors and other healthcare workers to have a flu vaccination to protect their patients this winter. Vulnerable groups, such as children, pregnant women and older people are also reminded to have their free jab. NHS staff are offered the vaccine free and NHS England will also offer it free to more than one million care-home workers this winter.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 15th of  October 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-41593914

According to a BBC investigation, Great Ormond Street Hospital is not meeting care standards for intersex children.  It found that some patients who had been born with sexual development disorders, and their families, had no access to psychological care. And not all cases were properly discussed before the patient had life changing, irreversible surgery. Health regulator Care Quality Commission is investigating. The hospital said it was committed to working with seriously ill children. Intersex, also known as disorders of sexual development (DSD), is when sex characteristics – including genitals, reproductive organs and chromosome patterns – do not fit into the typical notions of female or male bodies. There is currently no face-to-face psychological support for children and their families who have been referred in the last six months despite surgery continuing. The BBC understands tens of families are waiting for therapy. For several years not all children and their families have had access to face-to-face support, before having surgery, Not all cases were discussed at full the multidisciplinary team meetings at GOSH.  Information about this surgery is complex but information given to parents is not in a written form that they can take away, to ensure proper comprehension prior to giving informed consent for surgery.

….

Professor Ieuan Hughes, emeritus professor of paediatrics at the University of Cambridge and an expert in hormone disorders told the BBC that DSD was a “very complicated area of medicine”. He said it was vital families got support from a psychologist prior to making decisions about surgery, so parents were fully aware of the lifelong-implications on children.
When asked by the BBC if surgery should continue in hospitals not meeting the national standards, Professor Hughes said: “It seems reasonable to me to just take a pause, get the problem sorted and get back on track as soon as possible.” Worldwide, up to one point seven of people have intersex traits, according to the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner of Human rights. An NHS England spokesperson said: “Disorders of sexual development (DSD) are rare and complex, but it is right that children and their families should be appropriately involved in decisions about their care.”

….
The CQC has currently rated the surgical department at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust as requiring improvement.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2017/10/12/gps-should-conduct-appointments-standing-set-good-example-patients/

General practitioners should conduct appointments standing up in order to set a good example to patients, a conference of family doctors has heard. Medics are being urged to “practise what they preach” and use their personal behaviour to provoke discussion about the dangers of a sedentary lifestyle.

GPs should also consider cycling to home visits as well as encouraging colleagues to cycle or walk to work so surgery carparks are less crowded with cars, according to experts at the Royal College of General Practitioners (RGCP). Doctor Andrew Boyd, an activity champion at the royal college, said GPs remained “hugely trusted” by patients, yet only around forty percent were meeting Government exercise guidelines themselves.
….
The Chief Medical Officer recommends people take at least one hundred fifty  minutes of moderate exercise a week, as well as muscle strengthening exercises on two or more days a week. However, research indicates significantly fewer than fifty per cent of patients meet this recommended minimum. Doctor Boyd said some doctors are worried about appearing hypocritical by lecturing their patients to take more exercise when they are not active themselves. But he argued that family doctors should use their status in their communities to promote more healthy lifestyles.
….

The call was welcomed by the charity UK Active, a spokesman for whom said GPs were “trusted, they’re believed, so if they model good behaviour that’s a good thing.”

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-41594306

NHS leaders are urging nurses, doctors and other healthcare workers to have a flu vaccination to protect their patients this winter. Vulnerable groups, such as children, pregnant women and older people are also reminded to have their free jab. Sir Bruce Keogh, NHS England’s medical director, told the BBC he was worried about how staff would cope with a major flu outbreak.
He said the NHS was under “severe and unrelenting” pressure. His comments come following reports of a much higher incidence of flu in the Australian winter and the possibility that the same strain of the virus will be seen in Europe. NHS bosses said many people with flu showed no symptoms so healthcare workers could be unintentionally infecting vulnerable patients.

Getting vaccinated was the best way to stop the spread of flu and prevent deaths, they said.
NHS staff are offered the vaccine free and NHS England will also offer it free to more than one million care-home workers this winter. It wants employers to report how many people don’t get the vaccines – at some hospitals only thirty percent of staff have the jab while at others it is nearer to ninety percent. NHS England said twenty one million people would be eligible for the vaccine in total this winter. It has expanded the nasal flu vaccination programme to include children from the age of two up to and including those in school Year four. Children in reception year can now get their vaccine in school instead of going to their GP.

0 Comments

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.